Your experience with how jumper schooling differs from hunters.

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by slc, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    No comments from me, and no right or wrong answers. Curious about the range of different opinions that will be stated. No, this will not go in a novel, and yes, there are no right or wrong answers. Saw some hunter riders trying to adjust to show jumping schooling recently, and wonder how many different opinions on it we have here.
     
  2. walktrot

    walktrot Full Member

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    Just curious, why no comments from you?
     
  3. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    I feel like if you're going to jump your horse, that it pays to school "hunter" style sessions and "jumper" lessons. For example, getting a horse in a steady rhythm and finding really great distances is something every horse should be able to do. In my jumper lessons we will focus on adjustability doing a 6 stride in 7 strides or 4 strides, we also will add in roll backs or combinations. Those are some differences in my experience.
     
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  4. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    My casual observation, hunter seems to be more smooth, rhythmic and steady around the course, almost dressage-ish over fences. Jumpers tend to be more aggressive and faster with tighter turns and more complex questions.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I already know what happens if I comment, LOL.

    BUT OKAY, you twisted my arm, lol.

    I watched German trainer working with a hunter rider. Not just anyone. She was a really higher level hunter rider, and a very well-respected trainer. It was very obvious that she was not doing the type of flat work - or the type of jumping work - in the hunters, that the German trainer had his students do.

    In fact, she got jumped right out of the tack. Over a 3' fence.

    The arc of the horse over the jump is that different.

    The key with hunters is the style, right? A style one could ride all day out hunting. Compared to the jumpers, it's a flatter, more gradual, shallow arc over the jumps. It's a flatter, longer canter. This goes to original purpose. Again, to be maintained for hours, it needs to be this way. Smooth, easy, energy conserving.

    And to do jumpers, totally changes the schooling on the flat before you ever jump, the tack, everything. Not just about making sharper turns(yet that was the way most of my instructors taught it, and I still see instructors who do same).

    The whole way of riding changes. The exercises done. The flat schooling is very different.
    1. The amount of contact, rein length, amount of collection (not head/neck position per se, but actual change in the shape and length of stride, which is shorter and higher, and more energetic) - all these change DRASTICALLY. The contact especially is very different.
    2. The horse has to have more dressage work that is geared toward collection. The exercises on the flat before the jumping starts - that's very different, then, because there is much more schooling of transitions, and the transitions have to be from more clear extremes - for example, not working canter to a little lengthening to a working canter, but collected to extended canter, and back.
    3. The tack. Standing martingales replaced with running martingales, for example, to allow a different use of the back.
    4. Bit changes, too. That kimerwicke, slow twist, baucher, all those come off.
    5. The speed changes, not all that much, especially at the start.
    6. The layout of the jumps changes. They have more spread, they are closer together. Not necessarily so much higher (the standardized course for young horses in Germany, for example, is no higher than 3'3''.) The challenge is in how the fences are positioned relative to each other.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018

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