Yearling Height

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Frost Laced Dynamite, Feb 13, 2019.

  1. Frost Laced Dynamite

    Frost Laced Dynamite Full Member

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    I know you cannot be certain as every horse develops differently, but I’ve been told Quarter Horses develop slow? Is that true?
    My colt is 9 months old; he currently stands at 12.3hh. His dam is 15hh & his sire is 16.1hh I’m hoping he reaches at least 14.3hh

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  2. Dream27

    Dream27 Senior Member

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    He looks like he's doing fine. Some QH grow fast, some grow slower. As long as you give him the proper nutrition he needs, he will be fine. Parents heights aren't always completely telling of their offspring's final heights either. My Appy colt (he's half QH), who was born in April 2018 is around 14 hands. His parents are around 15.3 and brick houses.

    ETA: Are you sure he's 12.3?? Either the people in the photos are super short or he's a lot taller than 12.3.
     
  3. Frost Laced Dynamite

    Frost Laced Dynamite Full Member

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    Top of his wither measured 51”
    I’m in one of the pictures with him an I’m 5’2
     
  4. Dream27

    Dream27 Senior Member

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    Must have just been the angle of the pic tho, and you're shorter than me so that could be it as well.
     
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  5. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    They do vary a lot. April grew CRAZY fast from birth to about 10 months... my vet called her Moose for that first year. Luckily the rest of mine have been slower and steadier. In my experience, they stall a bit in the winter, then start growing again in the spring.

    you can do the string test and it will be fairly accurate with what his predicted mature height will be.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    There are plenty of ways to forecast that adult height.

    One way is to take an average of the parents' heights. You can average the full sibling's heights (siblings by the same sire and dam).

    Or....

    You can measure from the center of the knee to the coronary band on a front leg. At the 'center of the knee' there's a horizontal groove. That is where your measurement starts. The coronary band is that line on the front of the hoof where the hoof starts (and the hair ends).

    That measurement will not change after the horse is a year old, and it is exactly 1/4 of the adult height.

    So that means you can multiple the measurement by 4. So if the horse measures 14 inches from mid knee to coronary band, multiply 14 X 4, you can go to the trouble to determine that's 56 inches, divide it by 4 and say oh, that's 14 hands, but in fact, you can just look at that measurement in inches and that is the number of hands.

    So, for example, if the measurement is 14 1/2 inches, his adult height will be 14 hands and 2 inches(the half inch is multiplied by 4, that makes 2 inches, and that's half a hand, so you can treat a half an inch like a half a hand (2 inches).

    14 1/2 inches = 14.2 hands, and 15 inches = 15 hands, and 16.25 inches = 16.1 hands.

    This works fine with horses that grow slower because this measurement does not change after the horse reaches 1 year of age. This measurement will always be a quarter of the horse's full adult height whether he reaches that full adult height slowly or not.
     
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  7. Dream27

    Dream27 Senior Member

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    This works well if you have a proportional horse...however if you have a horse that is all legs, even as a 2 or 3 year old (eg. my Frosty)...it isn't very accurate. She measured 17.1 or some ridiculous number, and is about 16 hands. She's finally filling out in her body (at age 5), but for most of her life she has been a string bean with crazy unproportional legs.
     
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  8. HayleyS

    HayleyS Senior Member

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    This! According to all the string/leg height tests Helo should be just about 16 hands: he is not. He isn't even a real 15 hands...so not always 100% accurate. However, as my vet says, Helo will always be able to just walk over any obstacles other horses his height would have to jump lol:cautious::D:applaud: So there is that.
     
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  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Wuss Horse is also all legs and a string bean. And he, like most of them, is going to be within an inch or so of this estimate. He already looks 'finished.' He is going to gain in length of the body, but not much height.

    Most of them are quite close to this estimate. It's a good method.

    No method is perfect. I've used this one over and over. It's very good.
     
  10. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    It varies, they're doing fine. Very cute-!!
     

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