Would like advice, on how to go about handling 3 horses and 1 Colt, that are afraid of human contact

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Shellene, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. Zimalia

    Zimalia Senior Member

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    You are going to need separate corrals for each. Get the stallion gelded soon as possible. I know you know that, but if I don't say it I would feel I did you a disservice.
    Ok, once in separate corrals, get in there with a rope. Have your halters ready. Each one will take a while. The colt at 5 months is old enough to wean, so this is weaning time. But as I said, get your rope handy. Question, have you ever roped anything before? If yes, proceed. If no, go practice. you're going to need to get a rope on them and play with them. There is a LOT you can do with just a rope before you even try to put a halter on one. Once roped, give a tug and see if they will look at you. If yes, go from there and ask for more. If no, it's more work. Get them to look at you, then ask for one step. That's it, just one step. If you get that step, back off and let them think about it. If they are still looking at you with an easy eye, ask for another. It all starts from that one step.

    I have done a lot of unhandled horses of a lot of different ages. You can leave your rope on one in a corral. The lariat will loosen and slip off. Or, if the horse has progressed enough that you can handle it, you can remove it. But if you leave it on, that horse stays in that corral. There are a lot of lessons a rope can teach a horse all by itself, valuable lessons. Now before anyone reading this gets bent, I have done this and never had one hurt themselves. One lesson I particularly like is they learn if they step on their rope or lead rope, All this is done IN the corral, they learn not to freak out, they learn to simply step off it. Saves on reins later in life. I always left lead ropes on my foals until they were easy to walk up to. I have left lead ropes on older horses I halter broke as well. In the corral, they are not going to get it hung up on something and they learn to give to the rope. Makes things later on a lot easier.

    Once you can walk up to one, rub it's forehead. Don't go for all over yet, they're not ready. This has to be on their schedule, not yours. Walk up, hand over hand on the rope, and merely rub the forehead. Then step back. Ask for that first step again. If you get it, rub their forehead. If not, ask again. If they break, and run from you, they're not ready. Work them around the corral, and then ask again.

    It all starts from there. But that's enough to get you going on them.

    Good luck to you! Let us know how it's going.

    I know others use a different way, and that's fine. The more different ways that are presented will give you a choice. But this is how I do it. it works.
     
  2. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    This is the correct way to do this, and getting that stallion gelded is prority number 1 or the wild herd will keep growing.

    I would call those so called friends and shame them come help construct some small paddocks and separate the horses.

    These horses won't sell for peanuts... If they were worth something the previous owners would have sold them. I would run an add for free horses, explain he situation and someone with colt starting experience may show up to take them off your hands.
     
  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I like that. It can take years of practice before someone can rope something.

     
  4. brl_rcr72

    brl_rcr72 Full Member

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    Honestly I agree with everyone that said get someone experienced to help/do it. The idea to help these horse in and of itself is a nice idea. But one badly placed kick can seriously injure/kill someone. I know that sounds dramatic but it only takes one mistake, one miscommunication with horses (especially wild type ones) to start a full blown wreck. No one online can give you the hands on instruction this situation requires.
     
  5. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    They need to go to a rescue unless you're going to work with them every day and the stallion needs to be gelded, yesterday, regardless. There's no point to a stallion, especially an unhandled mustang, in this situation.
    That said, you need a chute to pen them in and put halters on them and some sort of smaller space to work with them OR you need somebody that can rope them and get halters on them and still a smaller space to work them in.

    This is a dangerous situation for them, the owner and you and not a quick fix. If you're willing to put the time and money into the equipment they need - good for you. I would not. Especially since the owner can't even walk out to see them.
     
  6. CJ

    CJ Senior Member

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    How are you figuring these ages if no one can get near enough to handle them?
    And a 2 yr old isnt a stallion its a colt, altho old enough to be entire.
    A 2 yr old mare with a 5 month old foal wouldve had to be bred @ 8 mos old. Even if shes 3 thats a long yearling breeding.
    Your LL needs to call these "friends" and have Them deal with theses horses. Losing the farm doesnt mean they get to dump and run their animals. If the owners have D&R then animal services or SPCA should be called, and the horses removed professionally as Abandoned.
    They at least need to be separated asap, before that stud decides to beat up the gelding and weanling over the mare. The baby risks getting easily and outright killed, at any moment and without warning.
    Youre a trainer and youve never approached a halterless Loose Horse?
    Theres a dearth of details or whiff of stone here..
     
  7. MuckMuck

    MuckMuck Senior Member

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    Make sure your medical insurance is up to date.

    Build corner pen with three portable panels.

    Feed horses inside OPEN panels for several days.

    Make opening smaller each day.

    Feed horses and work around them with NO intention of catching them.

    Feed horses and close panels.

    Let horses settle.

    I prefer to correl one horse at a time and after they settle work on gentle and willing haltering.

    The haltering comes from the horses understanding and not forcing the matter.

    Take your time.
     
  8. 250girl

    250girl Senior Member

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    #1 - absolutely separate them. Preferrably into smaller areas set up by panels.

    #2 - be ready to spend hours out there until you’re drenched in sweat and ready to cry. This is not going to be pretty, horse whispering , soul fluttering loveliness. Not with the mature ones.

    #3 - don’t get your face kicked off. They will usually fight just before they give letting you get through to them a try.

    #4 - lunge whip is your new best friend. That’s what you halterbreak them with, the long soft end of the whip over their face. Just because you can touch them does not mean it’s safe to put a halter over their face.

    Best course of action is to hire someone else to do this , on the owners dollar. If you give them away they will likely be meat.

    I’ve halterbroken 5 horses, 2 of them were completely feral, untouched, mature drafts (one was 4 , one was 7). Full on chute into trailer , back trailer into pen, bolt through panels , kick your face off it remotely cornered FERAL. Not pretty. Not safe.
     
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  9. 250girl

    250girl Senior Member

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    This is an example of the lunge whip method.
    As you can see, this was a Belgian cross, big girl. Halter in place or not , you’re not going to win a pulling match. So the method used was to ask her to give to the pressure : if she took a step or even followed it with her head she got a break. If she ripped her head away and tore off it would just slip off and I would go back without missing a beat to working her fairly hard with pressure around the smaller area. Then try again.
    Once they learn that giving and accepting is comfortable and relaxing , and resisting means work and discomfort .... then they give pretty quick.
    But that’s how you haltetbreak a mature and feral horse. Mentally.
    Also , the lunge whip is for touching them all over long before you ever use your hand.
    3DD156FF-D419-484A-B0B3-4CFA0DBDBE0B.jpeg
     
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  10. Zimalia

    Zimalia Senior Member

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    I never spent hours with a colt. 10 to 15 minutes tops. His attention span is not going to be that long, neither on an older horse. You want them to be looking forward to your next "visit". Longer just wears them out. Let the colt, horse, win. Finish on a high note and don't wear it out.
    If you lose your patience, YOU lose. Leave before that happens. Let the colt rest, and come back later in the day. They get frustrated too. Don't assume you are the only one.
    The more intelligent the colt/horse, the easier they are to work on.
     
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