Worming Schedule? - See post #8

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Acantha, Mar 21, 2009.

  1. NikkiBlaze14

    NikkiBlaze14 Full Member

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    Thank you!! They are stalled mostly and turned out in the arena (our pasture is still new and growing grass). My husband's father is home 24/7 so he cleans up after them literally multiple times a day. Picks poo up in the arena daily. Stalls cleaned daily, water buckets emptied daily or every other day. My horse is 18yrs old, my husband's is 16.
    When I worm them I always change it up...Everytime, I use a different wormer. Is there anything else you would need me to add?
     
  2. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    I suggest you should start your own thread for specific worming questions about your own horses....this is how this sticky informational thread gets to be 20 pages...then no one wants to read it. All the questions you're asking are already answered in this thread. Not trying to be rude, so I hope you don't take it that way. If you have specific questions, it would be helpful to just start a new thread so we can help you.
     
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  3. XxLiveToRidexX

    XxLiveToRidexX Senior Member

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    And it isn't just about "switching it up" and using a different dewormer every time you deworm. It is about pulling FEC so that you know exactly what worms the horse has and can pick a dewormer based off of that.

    I for instance go back between the same 2 dewormers (Equimax and Quest Plus), have for years because my gelding is an extremely low shedder and we have a high prevalence of tapeworms in Minnesota.
     
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  4. Ryle

    Ryle Senior Member

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    So in your situation the risk of parasite reinfection is really low. Picking up feces and stalling (where feces are picked up and the environment is not conducive to parasite survival) really reduce the risk that your horses are coming into contact with parasite eggs or larva. At 16 and 18, your horses are also not likely to have an issue with ascarids anyway. Your main concern then is going to be simple seasonal deworming to treat for botflies and possibly tapeworms. Seasonal deworming is done spring and fall with an ivermectin or moxidectin, either with praziquantel for tapeworms. These dewormings should be standard for all horses because bots and tapes aren't diagnosed on a fecal. Ivermectin and moxidectin also treat small strongyles. In your situation, tapeworm treatment is likely only necessary once a year but it is something you should consult your vet about. For the rest of the year, it's unlikely that you would need to deworm, but you should perform a Fecal Egg Count at least 12 weeks after using ivermectin or 16 weeks after using moxidectin just to ensure that your horses haven't picked up small strongyles just as a precaution.

    As has already been mentioned, it is not about rotating dewormers with adult horses. It's about using the appropriate product for the job.
     
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  5. NikkiBlaze14

    NikkiBlaze14 Full Member

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    Thank you everyone for the awesome advice!!! This really helps to clarify a lot!!
     
  6. NikkiBlaze14

    NikkiBlaze14 Full Member

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    Lol well I thought about that but usually I will get someone who says how there is already a thread or sticky about the subject so I figured I'd probably be screwed either way. Haha
     
  7. Ryle

    Ryle Senior Member

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    Please be aware that my comments are general recommendations. Be sure to consult your vet and get him involved in your deworming program. For example, it would be a good idea to get an idea of what kind of parasite load your horse normally carries. Many horses are highly resistant to parasites by the time they are adults and will be fine with minimal deworming, but some horses do not develop a good resistance to parasites and will need more frequent deworming than others.
     
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  8. NikkiBlaze14

    NikkiBlaze14 Full Member

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    Thank you! I will definitely talk with the vet. I will probably send our two samples out soon as spring is around the corner. Il probably go through parascreen.
     
  9. Roslyn Milano

    Roslyn Milano Registered

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    I used to deworm our horses every 8-10 weeks. I use medications like Mebendazole and Albendazole. These medications are also used by kids not under 2 year old. They are very effective in eliminating parasitic worms like Ascaris Lumbricoides and other types.
     
  10. Blonkey

    Blonkey Registered

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    I actually don't use worming paste at all. If an animal has enough copper in there system the worms won't stay around, I feed my horse 1/4 to 1/2 a teaspoon copper sulfate every day (with 1tablespoon of dolomite, 1 small tablespoon of yellow sulfur and a good dash of apple cider vinegar, she also gets a teaspoon of kelp every other day). I know that copper sulfate gets a really bad rap from most people, but horses with enough copper don't suffer from (as I said, internal parasites) rainscold, poor coat health, seedy toe, mud fever, hoof abseses, or any other fungul condition. If you do decide to try it please dissolve it in water to rend it non caustic (non burning), and mix it through the feed. The dolomite is very important too, as it will safeguard against accidental overdose. P.s dark horses (including chestnuts) need almost 6 times more copper then light colored ones, (this is why they suffer more from the above mentioned health disorders), so if you have a darkie you may need to give him a little more. Hope this helps
     

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