Worming Horses?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Snow White Horse, Dec 7, 2017 at 2:31 PM.

  1. Snow White Horse

    Snow White Horse Full Member

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    Hello!
    I don't have a horse, but I do have a question: How often do you need to worm your horse? I've read different things. Would a three-month schedule be fine?
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. WildLittleWren

    WildLittleWren Full Member

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    I do fecals with my vet 2x a year when he is out for vaccines (will do more if the horse is having suspect issues or problems), and worm according to that. It tells you if you NEED to worm and if so, what TYPE of wormer to use. Worming horses monthly, every 6 weeks, or 8 weeks is actually outdated, and actually causes a resistance to the wormer.
     
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  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    You take a fecal sample to the Vet and let them do a count of how many, and what kind of worm eggs are there, and he'll tell you what wormer to use.
    Later you take another sample to see if that cleared it up. In general you worm spring, and after first frost, as needed, and as needed in between.
     
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  4. Snow White Horse

    Snow White Horse Full Member

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    Thanks for answering. :)
    Is it common for a lot of horses to even get worms? And if they do, how often might they need to be dewormed?
     
  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    The veterinary advice these days is to run fecal tests to check for parasite eggs twice a year, and to ONLY give horses medications for specific worms that the test proves they actually have.

    If there was a high worm burden of any type of worm, retest in a few weeks to see if the horse was re-infected/if the medication worked.

    In the past people wormed horses 2, 3, 6 times a year, and did not test. The result was that the worms were constantly bathed in worming medication and some of them developed resistances to specific medications. In other words, a disaster. So the recommendation changed: TEST AND MEDICATE ACCORDING TO TEST RESULTS.

    If I had my horse in a high burden area (like a boarding stable or barn with many horses) I would test 3 times a year, but only worm as shown by the tests.
     
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  6. Snow White Horse

    Snow White Horse Full Member

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    That makes a lot of sense, slc. Very logical thinking.
    Thanks for informing me of that; it was very helpful information. :)
     
  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    All horses get worms. They eat off the ground where worms lay their eggs.
     
  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    All horses get worms, yes. The key is to remove the worms with medication when there gets to be too many of them and they start interfering with the horse's health.

    There is evidence that parasites are to some extent, 'beneficial', in that they seem to encourage animals to make seasonal adjustments. The thing is, we don't want the worms to be so numerous that they cause any problems.

    Overheard conversation between boarder and elderly vet:

    'Does my horse have worms?'

    'Yes.'

    'Oh no! That's terrible! I was just KISSING him! Pleh! Pleh! Pleh! Oh MY GOD! Do I have them now? What medicine should I give him? Should I take him into the clinic???? Oh My God, I KNEW he wasn't doing well!!'

    'Nope.'

    'Well which medicine should I give him?'

    'Nothin'.'

    'What?'

    'Well, a few worms aren't bad. Keeps him busy, you know.'

    'WHAT? Are you POSSESSED? Are you on the WORM'S SIDE?'

    Moral of the story: a few worms are normal, a lot are not good.
     
  9. SEAmom

    SEAmom Senior Member

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    Manes is right. All horses get them. Some hang on to them more than others. That's one reason why it's important to have them checked with a fecal egg count. You can identify horses who are high shedders and low shedders. What that means is that some horses really do need worming more frequently and the vet can say which to use and when and some horses are good with a quick dose in the spring and fall to get rid of the basics that aren't picked up on a FEC. Another reason to do the FEC is to mitigate resistance in worms. That is really becoming a big problem and probably the most important reason to do the FEC rather than a rotational worming.
     
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  10. Snow White Horse

    Snow White Horse Full Member

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    Oh, okay. Thanks, guys.
     

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