Who are my mane pullers?

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by horsey_girl10, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. horsey_girl10

    horsey_girl10 Full Member

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    I thought maybe this would be of use!
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I doubt very much that pulling a horse's mane hurts it. Seriously. It's not like hair on a human scalp. And I also very much doubt the method she shows would result in a decent-looking job.

    I think the reason horses get restless when their mane is pulled, is that the way horses fight or play is they bite each other on the crest of the neck. The last thing I want to do is invite some 16 hand youngster to play with me. So horses have to be taught to ignore what to them, is an invitation to fight or play.

    And of course the horse wants to react to flies bothering it by biting at them, and rarely wants to stand still for an hour or two while its entire mane is pulled.

    The other thing of course is that mane pulling was never designed for addressing a 24" long, 6 inch thick mane. Pulling is a tradition that first evolved around Thoroughbreds and quite a few of them have thin fairly short manes naturally. Pulling was always more of a maintenance of an already short, thin mane that had been kept that way since the animal came into training, with a few hairs done at a time. A few hairs at a time were wrapped around a mane comb and pulled out. The goal was to have a rather short, thin mane that could be braided into small braids easily.

    It was never really intended that a person pull a mane that had been ignored for a year or two, and pull it all, all at once.

    Of course short cuts came along - a friend uses a clipper blade in her hand, which pulls a few hairs and cuts off others.

    If it was very long and thick, the mane was, and even today, is generally cut to near the desired length and then thinned a bit at a time (it's a lot harder on the groom's hands than it is on the horse). Most people I know use a blade if an initial cut is needed, so they don't wind up with a blunt 'Dutch Boy' look. It isn't necessary to pull it extremely thin to avoid that 'chopped off' look.

    But in fact styles change over time. A lot of people have switched from the very small short braids to European plaits - 9 or 12 braids, and the hair is thicker and longer. And in fact with that style of braiding rather little pulling is needed. The mane can be left twice as long, and the thickness of the mane isn't a problem, it actually looks better plaited if the mane is rather thick. That's generally how I leave my horse's manes. It looks decent without requiring a lot of fussing and they have enough mane that it protects them from flies when they're turned out.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    :rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

    Boy, you haven't had more than a couple horses in your life, have ya? :rofl::rofl::rofl:

    QUITE a few horses show sensitivity to mane pulling. It's just common sense~!! Not one thing to do withhorses playing, and biting each other's crests. You are not HOLDING the Crest.

    You think horse's crests could not be as sensitive as human scalp? What? If you prick them do they not bleed? Have a sit down slc. Let's yank a few strands of hair at a time outta your head, then let's see if that bothers ya or not~!! :rofl:

    Anyone who has groomed horses for the show ring, pulled and braided will tell you: “Some horses won't tolerate mane pulling. Some do not seem to mind much.“
     
  4. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    It hurts. Full stop.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Then don't pull the horse's mane. That's fairly simple to grasp. Or improve one's technique.

    But if it hurts them all so terribly, why do mine always stand there perfectly happy while it's done? Without ever once being punished harshly or even being punished at all?

    For one it's got to be done properly. You don't tear out big gobs of hair at once.

     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  6. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Come on SLC, just stop. We all know it hurts and only to do it parsed out timewise.

    Cutting and thinning is the way to go.
     
  7. reicheru

    reicheru Senior Member

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    Yeaaah... I suspect it's a lot like going and getting a bikini wax. Some don't mind.... I, personally, do. Very much. lol
     
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  8. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    I have some horses that really like being pulled and I have some that don’t on the ones that don’t we use thinning shears.... it really depends on the horse.
     
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  9. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    I would never pull mane. You get results just as good using a couple pairs of scissors and/or a razor.
     
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  10. horsey_girl10

    horsey_girl10 Full Member

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    I figured this would be controversial.
     

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