What to feed a 2 year old?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by KZWestern, Sep 21, 2009.

  1. KZWestern

    KZWestern Senior Member+

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    I just bought myself a two year old Holsteiner filly. She's awesome!! Just a beautiful, beautiful horse sold for a rediculously low price due to the economy. Anyways, at her old barn she was fed Nutrina Compete, but I'm not sure if this is the right option for a 2 year old... What do you guys think a good grain option would be for a very BIG, growing warmblood?
     






  2. Faith04

    Faith04 Senior Member+

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    my tip is, not too much. Please don't go thinking that because they are big and are getting bigger, that you need to go feeding heaps of processed feed (especially protein) as this can lead to all sorts of problems in the future inc OCD

    A good base of quality hay is always beneficial. The WB stud I was at fed chaff (lucerne and oaten), whole oates, and pellets(mitavite calm performer) with vitamin and mineral supplements. Never had any growth problems in any horse.
     
  3. PeggySue

    PeggySue Senior Member+

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    Protiens DOES NOT cause OCD's !!!!!


    Free choice forage with a good vitamin/mineral or ration balancer to BALANCE the diet which is hte key
     
  4. Faith04

    Faith04 Senior Member+

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    no I agree, but causing the horse to grow too fast usually by feeding too much grain etc can, and that was my main gist, sorry if it was misinterperated I did not mean to lay the blame at the foot of protein:wink:

    It is a common misconception that big babies need lots of energy feed ie grain (which has protein :wink:) to help them grow big and strong and this is where some get into trouble. I totally agree that a balanced diet is a must
     
  5. Huntseatin593

    Huntseatin593 Senior Member

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    I feed Legends (Southern States feed) Grow and Perform. My 2yr old gets a scoop and a half twice a day with good quality grass hay. She has done really well on it.
     
  6. txgray

    txgray Senior Member+

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    The first question would be what hay are you feeding? The second question would be what condition is she in (thin, overweight, just right)? Third question would be how much Complete was she getting? At this age it's really important to not only have enough protein/vitamins/minerals, but also to be sure that the diet is balanced.

    I just recently switched my 2yo WB from a 14% Nutrena pellet to TC30 with alfalfa pellets. I've been extremely happy with the results.
     
  7. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

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    Starches cause growth issues; protein does not.

    Growing horses need a LOT of quality protein - ample amino acids, not just high crude protein.

    Feed the nutrition first, then adjust calories as the horse's growing spurts dictates.
     
  8. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member+

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    I like Nutrena Compete....a lot of ppl here will tell you how much they dont like it and how "bad" it is ....blah blah... I used it for years and had amazing results. The WP barn where I used to work also feeds it and has great results.

    BUT, I have since switched to a RB....and let me tell you what... I LOVE IT and my horses look EVEN better. I am now feeding Buckeye Grow N Win and I would never go back to anything else.

    And FYI, I was feeding two 2yr olds and a 5yr old horse in competition.
     
  9. Dawn

    Dawn Senior Member+

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    It's not the protein that it has that's the problem. It's the sugars and starches (that are much more plentiful in grains than protein is) that are the problem with growth disorders.
     
  10. PeggySue

    PeggySue Senior Member+

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    Dawn don't forget the Ca:p ratio as well
     






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