What OLD people know about Horses and how they know it.

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by manesntails, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    I was just chatting with Arem and we were talking about bits. So, I said to her, that she should ride the horse 4 or 5 times in the bit before she decides if she likes it or not.

    Old people know this because we know how it is getting used to new
    dentures~!! :D

    When a horse starts to seem stiff and warms up slowly, we Old People get this right away, because it's the same for us every morning~!! :cooldance: Gotta trot in place to get the joint lubrication up and going, so we KNOW to trot the horse to get his joint lubrication up and going as well.

    We also know that when an old horse gets diarrhea, and his teeth are okay, not dropping any food and still chewing fine, that he needs a Probiotic because :whistle:
    WE are taking them at our age as well~!!



    All you Old People, come on in and add yours~!!
    What do YOU automatically know about horses that the younger crowd might not think of?

    You YOUNG people can add in stuff you learned from the OLD people too~!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2017
  2. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    It takes time for eyes to adjust from light to dark, so we always pause for adjustments now.

    Joint supplements are a good idea.

    Just because something doesn’t hurt now, doesn’t mean it won’t later, check out how they recover.
     
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  3. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    Well 44 is old enough to know that you can work out of the pain/stiffness.

    And ya the eyes need time to adjust.

    Mostly I now know to slow down and give the horse time to think things through.
     
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  4. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Experience also tells us that if you get something wonderful, STOP, do not ask for it again, because we know that getting praise for something and stopping is powerful....
     
  5. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    All from my cranky old almost-related-to-me-because-she-is-my-cousin's-wife's-aunt horse vet that basically held my hand through Calypso's pregnancy and foaling:
    Look at the whole animal, not just the symptoms.
    Just because you CAN doesn't mean it is a smart thing to do.
    Human safety comes first. Always. YOU CAN'T HELP THE HORSE IF YOU DIE.

    From my cow vet:
    Horses try to find new ways to die, I don't want to play that game. (on why he would NOT be my horse vet)

    Not horses, exactly, but I think maybe applicable. . .
    Vet has become more and more reluctant to put animals down over the yars. Basically, if she can eat and looks alert, he will argue against putting her down. When my old pet Guernsey was nearing the end, I agonized over when it was her time. I asked him at one point if he thought she was suffering.
    "You know, suffering is relative. I am sure she is in pain, but is she suffering? I would argue no. Watch her eat, look at her eye. She is content with her lot in life, and until that chamges, aspirin twice a day and a soft bed at night. As I get older, I really start to appreciate he difference between pain and suffering-- they don't always go hand-in-hand. She will decide when it isn't worth getting up to come eat, and that will be her time. Until then, let her enjoy the sun."
    I think about that a lot. Is she in pain? Is she suffering? My old dog is starting to struggle, this is probably her last winter. She isn't actually in any pain, (well, says the vet) but I think between the decline in her hearing, non-existent sight, and loss of control on her legs (old spinal injury wrecks havoc with her legs, twitching etc) I think she is starting to be unhappy.
    Vet I take her to assures me that the nerve damage is such that she is not in any pain, but just looking at her. . . I think her quality of life is declining so that she is starting to suffer.
     
  6. Tige Ress

    Tige Ress Full Member

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    If you want me to do something, do not nag me in a passive aggressive manner. Tell me clearly what you need/want, and I will do my best. Horses want the same thing.

    And if we have just met, do not crowd my space. I want to size you up
     
  7. paval

    paval Senior Member

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    I know not to express worry to a senior horse owner that taking care of a horse might be too much for them.... because I know that horse may be the one thing that still gives them cause to get out of bed every morning.
     
  8. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

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    I LOVE this and it's so true. I have helped so many old and sick animals through their last days by this point. Some people think you're a terrible person if you let a dog or horse or anything else live with pain, but... humans live with chronic pain too. The animal always tells you when it's time.
     
  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    That's only because euthanazia isn't LEGAL to do for humans......yet.
     
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  10. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

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    Don't you think that's kind of oversimplifying? I'm not opposed to euthanasia for humans but I should hope it would be a case of the person deciding for themselves it was time to go or being in a coma or having brain damage and being unlikely to wake up... not my spouse or parents or whatever seeing me hobbling around in the morning, hearing from a doctor I will always have joint issues and tearfully deciding it's time for me to stop living in pain.

    I think some people jump the gun on their pets out of guilt. My brother had his dog PTS because it was severely arthritic. The dog needed some help getting down stairs ad was ultra stiff when first standing but still had her personality, eyes were bright, good appetite, etc. I find stuff like that weird; pain isn't the sole indicator it's time for an animal to die.
     
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