What is Blistering?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by getupasb, Aug 23, 2010.

  1. getupasb

    getupasb Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Messages:
    3,151
    Likes Received:
    684
    My vet has talked about possibly blistering my horses shoulder. I have heard it's big on the tracks but I don't know what it is. How does it work?
     
  2. horsesR4life

    horsesR4life Senior Member+

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    1,832
    Likes Received:
    61
  3. getupasb

    getupasb Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Messages:
    3,151
    Likes Received:
    684
    I'm assuming that is what she is talking about, but how would that help if he had some kind of shoulder issue? Whether it be bone or muscle? She injected his shoulder today and said if it helped that she'd like to blister it in a month or so.
     
  4. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Messages:
    66,438
    Likes Received:
    31,479
    Blistering in this case refers to, most likely, a ligament around the shoulder, maybe the bone itself. What exactly is wrong with the shoulder?
     
  5. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    33,584
    Likes Received:
    65,306
    You don't blister a bone. Blistering affects the skin, muscle and sometimes ligaments and tendons, dependent upon how much you use.

    We don't blister shoulders on the track, just legs. Is this a racetrack vet or just a riding horse vet?
     
  6. kb1gra

    kb1gra Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,965
    Likes Received:
    3,473
    Blistering refers to injecting a caustic substance into a joint in order to cause scar tissue to strengthen the connective tissue or ligaments within the joint. It's common in stifle injuries, never heard of it done to a shoulder though? The muscle structure in the stifle is much simpler than in the shoulder.
     
  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    33,584
    Likes Received:
    65,306
    I've never heard of "injecting" a blister.

    Blister, most commonly cedar oil, is applied to the skin. It irritates the leg. When applied lightly it irritates just enough to cause a mass of blowflow to the leg. The blood is what heals the underlying injury that you are blistering for.

    Agreed, never heard of blistering a shoulder.
     
  8. tbtrainer

    tbtrainer Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2007
    Messages:
    9,719
    Likes Received:
    1,793
    You can blister legs, kees, ankles, stifles and backs... those are quite common at the track. Blistering can be done internally or externally. It involves a counter irratant to promote blood flow, thought to promote healing.

    External blistering is quite common, and depending on how much blistering agent you use can provide a light scurf to actual sloffing off of the skin (yuck). You can blister externally with a myraid of products...listerine can blister a horse, so can DMSO, linements, certain dish soap (palmolive) etc.

    Different things are used for internal blistering, Almond oil mixed with iodine 2% was very common for stifles. I believe that the mixture has been pulled by the FDA...will have to check on that.
     
  9. getupasb

    getupasb Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2010
    Messages:
    3,151
    Likes Received:
    684
    Thank you. She is not a race-track vet that I know of, but she is one of the top vets in the state. I trust her ideas but I really didn't know what it is. I thought she said it would be an injection, so it must be what the last few people said

    because she told me it would promote blood flow in that area to heal it.

    Thanks again guys!
     
  10. Theorist

    Theorist Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,365
    Likes Received:
    1,993
    What TB trainer said.

    And no to injecting a "blister" into a joint... Injecting into the soft tissue of the stifle or the shoulder, yes. Into the joint, no.
     

Share This Page