What is Banamine?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Ringo, Jan 31, 2007.

  1. Ringo

    Ringo Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    18
    I've been wondering:
    What is Banamine?
    What is it used for?
    How do you give it to the horse?
    Thanks in advance!:)
     






  2. countryacres

    countryacres Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Messages:
    3,507
    Likes Received:
    155
  3. Ringo

    Ringo Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    18
    Thanks! When I was working on monday my boss said that her gelding coliced that morning and she gave him banamine for it. Does it really help colic?
     
  4. tbtrainer

    tbtrainer Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2007
    Messages:
    9,717
    Likes Received:
    1,784
    Banamine is a non-stererodial anti-inflammitory drug, it is in the same category as bute and asprin, it comes in oral or liquid for intervenious injections. It's a perscription drug, we always keep a bottle on hand at our barn. I give a half tube for horses if they are tying up along with ace, if I dont have injectable. It relieves pain in colicking horses and can fight off toxins that are sometimes released into the bloodstream during severe colic. You have to be careful though because just like bute it can mask a fever so you should always take a temp before giving it to your horse. We dont give it to young horses because it can cause gastro intestinal problems. Also dangerous to give to dehydrated horses, it could cause kidney disease. Hope that helps!
     
  5. countryacres

    countryacres Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Messages:
    3,507
    Likes Received:
    155
  6. Xiphias

    Xiphias Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2005
    Messages:
    18,638
    Likes Received:
    1,111
    Great post! I keep a dose of it in the frig, incase my mare gets colic, but always call my vet before giving it...Cathy
     
  7. tbtrainer

    tbtrainer Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2007
    Messages:
    9,717
    Likes Received:
    1,784
    Hey Cathy, you dont need to keep it in the fridge, just at room temp. Just thought you might want to know if your fridge is already crowded like mine!
     
  8. Ringo

    Ringo Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    18
    Thanks everyone! I've been wondering for a while now what it is. Is there anything else I should have on hand in case my horse colices? Also, how can you tell if it's colicing? All I know is sometimes they lay down, look pained, and bite their stomache. Is there anything else? (Sorry about going off topic!)
     
  9. countryacres

    countryacres Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Messages:
    3,507
    Likes Received:
    155
  10. 4hooves4me2

    4hooves4me2 Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    360
    Be careful with the im shot though. I just did that and about killed my mare. It seems there is a bacteria that thrives with it. It started out she had put her legs through a fence, so I gave her a banimine shot, she wasn't wanting to move around much, and she was getting stiff, vet said it was ok, so I did. I went out to check her, and I scratched her neck, and it sounded like a cardboard box. When I pushed on her neck it had bubbles in the muscle tissue, she was literally being eaten alive by this bacteria. It is terrible-I never want to see it again, and I will NEVER give another im shot of banamine. It either goes in a vein, or it will be the oral tube of it. I have just under $2000 in her now, from U of I vet bills. They said she is lucky-they generally don't make it with it. (I did get a discount for it being an extremely rare case with her, I got her in so early, they were able to learn from it all.)

    BANAMINE REACTIONS (pics)

    Banamine®(flunixin meglumine) is considerably more expensive than bute, so it is usually reserved to treat colic pain on a short term basis. It does not stay in the horse's bloodstream as long as bute, so it is less likely to cause toxicity. But high doses, especially in foals or dehydrated horses, can still cause kidney and digestive tract toxicity. Banamine® is available as oral granules and as an injectable formulation. The injectable product is labelled for intramuscular or intravenous use. I highly recommend that Banamine® only be administered by intravenous injection. The Banamine® formulation causes significant muscle damage when injected, which may result in a "flesh eating" infection by clostridial bacteria. These bacteria only grow in an environment without oxygen. The muscle damage from the Banamine® formulation provides this perfect environment. Clostridial infections in the muscles are life-threatening. Finding a swollen, painful area that is cool to the touch and has the crackling feeling of gas bubbles under the skin is an indication of this very serious infection.

    U of I told me, that the banamine acts like a 'bloom' for this particular bacteria. Just be SUPER careful with this stuff-
     






Share This Page