What is a surcingle?

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by MelissaH, Jun 16, 2005.

  1. MelissaH

    MelissaH Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2004
    Messages:
    8,573
    Likes Received:
    3,138
    and how is it used. Lately I have been noticing them in catalogs.
     
  2. arabgirl15

    arabgirl15 Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    3,411
    Likes Received:
    268
    Good question, I don't know either.
     
  3. AQHA_Gizmo

    AQHA_Gizmo Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2004
    Messages:
    4,011
    Likes Received:
    131
    /\ Ditto! Hmm...
     
  4. arabgirl15

    arabgirl15 Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    3,411
    Likes Received:
    268
    LOL........"and nobody knows" lol
     
  5. Bella

    Bella Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Messages:
    6,126
    Likes Received:
    728
    A surcingle is a training device, often used on young horses. It is like a harness, without all of the extra pieces attached to it. They are most often used while lunging a horse. Not only does it allow the horse to become used to something "holding" its belly, but it is also helpful if you are going to use training devices such as side reins while lunging, as it gives you something to attach them to. :) Some breeds of horses are also shown in hand wearing one.

    -Bella :running:
     
  6. MissBandit

    MissBandit Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Messages:
    13,661
    Likes Received:
    851
    Right Bella. You would use this for long lining, or driving, a horse while they are in training on how to respond to reins. The line attaches (on each side) to the bit, runs through a ring on the side (depending on how high you want to position your line) and runs back to the handler.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. pnh

    pnh Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Messages:
    269
    Likes Received:
    31
    theres also just elastic ones that you can put around your covers to keep the wind from blowing up them or over your saddle pad if you wanna ride bareback but dont want it to slip. its just like an elastic belt.. and theres the ones like in the pic aswell... pretty much same idea
     
  8. stockhorse

    stockhorse Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2005
    Messages:
    452
    Likes Received:
    116
    sorry guys that is not a surcingle.A surcingle is a second girth, mainly used on stock saddles.It goes outside the flaps and over the top of the saddle just behind the pommle.What you have a picture of is a lungeing surcingle and has the attachments tofit rollers for mouthing ,side reins etc..Anything refered to in rug ads is normally elastic and simply fits around the girth line to help hold a rug in place.
     
  9. Sandra-A1

    Sandra-A1 Senior Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2003
    Messages:
    11,982
    Likes Received:
    6,302
    My Surcingle is part of a bitting rig.

    My bitting rig has the surcingle, overcheck/side-check, side reins, crupper, long lines/driving reins, and a longeing cavasson. (see diagram)
    I also have a set of racing blinkers I also use with my bitting rig, if I am going to continue on with the training and teach the horse to pull a cart. :D

    I like to have any horse I own become aquatinted with and comfortable wearing all the different parts no matter what performance career they might be headed for.
     
  10. Linssue55

    Linssue55 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    13
    Surcingle

    It is like a wide leather belt that goes around the entire barrel of the horse and buckles lika belt. It is used for lungeing the horse by attaching side reins to it in the rings on it. Side reins aid the horse in bending, brings up and softens the back, it aids in a proper head set bending at the poll, engages the rear end promotes engaged hock action. In general side reins teaches the horse to work its body properly, surcingle is just something that things attach too....Linda
     

Share This Page