What are the basic basics!!!

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by mooselady, Nov 2, 2017.

  1. Quarter Girl

    Quarter Girl Senior Member

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    I had a friend who has long since moved. But before they moved they had this one mare who I believe was 7. They just believed she was the “best begginer horse” you could have and they went on and on about this “awesome begginer horse”. This horse didn’t like to be caught. Could tie reasonably well, would wiggle a bit then quiet down. Jumped to the side when you tossed a saddle in her. The horse walked off when you got on. Selective obidience when it came to speed, stopping and turning. Would kick out if you told her no actually you are going to go faster. Routinely rubs people off on trees, bucks them off and bolts...”begginer eh?” :confused::rolleyez:

    Basics for me. Stand still when your tied, being saddle, being mounted and when I tell you woah and I’m on you don’t move till I ask. Horse must stop at any gait when I say whoa, I should not have to touch my reins. Have a general idea on turning forequarters and turning hindquarters. I should be able to ride horse in a straight line or in a circle moving through all 3 gaits and pick up the correct lead when I’m in a circle.
     
  2. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    Kind of sounds like the horse's saddle doesn't fit.
     
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  3. Quarter Girl

    Quarter Girl Senior Member

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    Ya I’m a stong believer it didn’t fit. The owner had zero clue what so ever how to tack up a horse. It was a cheap saddle they found at a garage sale for like $50 I think and any horse they rode they rode it in the same saddle
     
  4. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    Then the horse may have been a fantastic beginner horse.

    Can't fault the horse for an owner's mistake.
     
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  5. Quarter Girl

    Quarter Girl Senior Member

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    Ya if they bothered to saddle the horse. It was far from a begginer horse. Lol!
     
  6. Ashley Anderson

    Ashley Anderson Registered

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    Personally as a trainer I ensure not to keep horses in the arena 24/7 because they begin to get sticky and shut down. Taking a horse out on trails really allows them to open up and enjoy lessons. When starting colts I ensure they can walk, trot, canter with a squeeze of my leg, turn with ease, flex both sides, and stop with my seat before thinking about taking them on the trail.

    I usually spend my first 2 rides in the roundpen and on the 3rd ride I will start in the roundpen and then move out to the arena. Once I have a steady colt in the arena I am working on lots of cantering. I think of cantering as a hamster running to spin the wheel to get the brain thinking. You are able to cover more miles, wet saddle pads, and concentrated training. In the arena over the next few days I am working on getting a consistent speed at the canter (most horses will speed up or slow down rather than stay at the same pace), and work on stops and getting the horse to learn to read my seat. From there I am able to start teaching the horse to follow close to the fence rather than where he wants to go as well as turning. Once I feel I have those basics pretty well understood I take the horse out on the trails (groundwork outside the arena as well).

    On the trails I am consistently working my horse. The main problem I find with riders on the trail is they let their horse find what they want to spook at next. Instead of sitting on your horse, make him move his feet. Circle around trees and scary objects, ask for different speeds and stops, work on circles and going the direction you want to go, circle around horses, etc. As stated above I love cantering. I am not saying run your horse the entire time your working him but depending on weather have him canter 8-10 min and then rest. The best way to get a loyal, trusting horse is to have the wet saddle pads, concentrated training, and miles under their feet. I then throw in exercises out on the trail and in the arena. I love working out on the trail and coming back to do work in the arena after to help teach a horse not to rush home after a trail ride. Of course I like to cool down my horse and allow him to stand tied after the lesson for at least 10 min to allow him to think about what he did in the lesson.

    .....................................................................................................
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  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    I disagree with all that cantering, although it builds wind, it doesn't build stamina, muscle, bone and tendon strength as well as trotting does. I want longer episode of trot that are slowly built up to five mile capability without blowing or showing other signs of fatigue and only minute long loping exercises focusing on rhythm and relaxation.
     
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  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I don't believe in wet saddlepads creating a loyal or trusting horse. They create a tired horse. I'm not interested in a horse that's only obedient when he's tired.

    A very good trainer I used to know would come ride in the early morning. None of the youngsters got loped, longed or turned out or round penned or long lined before she rode them. They were all very hot, high energy horses. They each got a short, easy, quiet ride. There was never any drama even when it was freezing cold.

    She would ride and then turn out and the horses would go tearing around the pasture. Most of the younger trainers would say, "That's not possible. I didn't just see that." But then again, the young folks had a lot of lame young horses, and the other gal didn't......

    I wouldn't canter a just backed horse for 8-10 min straight or do long trail rides . The whole ride wouldn't be longer than ten minutes at that point. Even the endurance riders I know don't put in long rides or lots of cantering on just-backed horses. For me the just backed horse is a year or more away from any long rides or longer canters.

    I don't think it's just about gait chosen. The problem for me is the horse just isn't fit enough to canter a lot when it's been just backed(well, during that whole year he isn't going to be very fit, and rushing that will hurt him).

    Trotting is generally the best gait for getting a green horse more fit and its tendons and bones more firmed up(which protects it from injury.....), because the weight is completely off each diagonal for a time in each stride(so each stride of the gait itself is like a mini-interval training routine), and because it's a symmetrical gait where the horse tends to be straighter and better balanced than in the canter.

    On a very hot day the saddle pad might be wet just from walking around a little, but in general, I'm not into wet saddlepads. Once the horse has been in work for a year or so and has some basic fitness, I want to see sweat on targeted areas to be sure those muscles are working, like between the hind legs. I don't want to see a lot of sweat on the neck or under the saddle as that's usually due to mental stress or just overwork. I also want to 'ride the horse dry' during the cooling out period. He shouldn't arrive at the barn wet.


     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2018
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  9. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    Yep....nothing builds muscle and gets a horse fit better than long trotting.....lots of it.
     
  10. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Agree about the lunging and riding until they are tired. You just end up lunging more and more as the horse builds up more stamina. Seeing that now at my barn with a just turned five year old show horse. They worked her hours every day at the show last week even the days she wasn't showing including lunging until the horse was covered in sweat, at least a half hour each time. Sometimes lunged twice too. Then ran into the first day she was pooped in her third WP class. Then the last day she was already pooped by the second class.
     

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