What are the basic basics!!!

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by mooselady, Nov 2, 2017.

  1. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Inspired by yet another debate about trail horses v 'arena' horses, led me to wonder what would you consider the basics that every horse should have...

    Pretty obviously, the ability to change gait and steer, and a decent set of brakes.....but is there anything else that you think should be a universal basic?

    I would add, being able to move off the leg and sidepass in some form or other, so you can maneuver where you need to, moving off seat and legs rather than hands. A back up, standing like a rock for mounting, the ability to be tied and stand tied, either hard or ground tied....

    I'm sure there is more....
     
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  2. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    I don't consider moving off of seat and legs to be a necessary skill. Many, many, many equines live long, productive and healthy lives never knowing how to move off of a rider's seat or legs. I don't think any equine in my husbands family, raising apps and mules for 50 years, has EVER learned that because my FIL doesn't know how. My husband is learning and is loving it and my FIL is starting to see the advantages but necessary or basic those skills are not. Same with backing. Sure is handy but an equine can be used and useful with out it.

    Hmmm. Stop, change gaits, steer, stand tied. Yep, all necessary for even the most rudimentary equine activity other than bronc riding. Trailer loading is necessary for me don't know if it is for everyone.
     
  3. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    LOL, we got a great solid cob into the stable in the UK to use for the Disabled Group, I got to take him to the first show, just to ride him around and check he was going to be safe. Rode him up between two vehicles to talk to someone, THEN found he had no reverse installed, did not have a clue..I had to slide off and literally push him back. It astounded me, I can't imagine a horse or a car with no reverse gear!
     
  4. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

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    Ooooooh this will be golden. I can't wait to hear the replies of the basic basics from a few select members... :applause:
     
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  5. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    Me either! I have had to teach every one of my husband's and FIL's animals to back though. They, my husband and FIL don't consider it necessary but like they can now back one up without a battle. I had to teach the little mule team to back also. As well as they were trained by the original owner, they had no back up.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I think all of the items below are necessary whether these things happen in a show setting or out on the trail.

    I think for the health of the horse, trailer loading safely is a real must for any horse. He might have to go to the vet, or be a buddy to one who has to go. I also would be in a bad situation if I was trail riding, and due to illness of me or someone else, weather or natural disaster I had to haul a horse out of an area, and he wouldn't get in the trailer.

    I don't think riding off the leg and seat is a necessary skill. Most people don't know how to ride that way so it's pointless(obviously for a dressage horse, yes, he's gotta know seat and legs). I think turning obediently off a neck rein or direct rein, stopping and standing still (even if other horses are moving faster or leaving), being 'rated' (can walk, trot, canter fast or slow on request), backing up are pretty much must-haves.

    One of the most crucial things for any horse, I think, is being able to get on and ride him away from the barn, even if he's alone! That's pretty important! I'd like to be able to ride him away from a group, too.

    For a trail horse, I'd say not being afraid of the usual wildlife or common sights and sounds would be indispensable. That's also really important for a show horse. I'd also like a trail horse to be able to jump logs or low stone walls without losing his head.

    And I'd like a trail horse to gallop without pulling, to let horses canter past on either side, or canter along in a group with other horses next to him. He should be able to walk back to the barn without trying to bolt every second, even if some other horses canter past him.

    Around here, it's a bit useful if a trail horse will jump a coop. They're often put over barb wire. Drops and ditches are common on trails too.

    I was at a show when a gigantic horse ran into the (plastic chain) dressage arena fence and pulled it almost entirely up and wrapped it partly around his legs and partly used some of it as party streamers(that'd be about 420 feet of flying white plastic chain), and started running directly at my horse.

    About that time, I says to myself, contemplatively like, 'Gee, I never taught him about this.' And ah...no. He was not prepared, lol.

    Another time I was slobbing along, no reins, no stirrups and some 'high and mighty' (according to our instructor....) FEI rider galloped past me screaming, 'SORRY!!!!'

    Fortunately my otherwise insane horse was so shocked he only bolted a little.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Oh my gosh. I never heard of or rode a horse that won't move off seat or leg. If you choose to just sit and not initiate the motion with your body, or choose to use rein before leg, as soon as someone who gets on and does use seat and leg, the horse is going to respond. Probably over respond, but respond he will.

    I got a lot of rough broke Mustangs to finish when I was a kid. They all got taught what leg meant, taught to stand to mount, hoof handle, back, turn on the forehand, turn on the haunches, two track, etc., etc, and none of it started with the bit or force. Doesn't take much to take one from rough broke to broke, after you get them to stop taking off as soon as you put weight in a stirrup, that is.

    English trainers around here send their colts to a Western trainer to be broke. They all use the same guy. They aren't interested in starting colts and he's the best around. The horse finishes 90 days and goes right into English tack. No problem.
     
  8. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    LOL, maybe you ride by telepathy?

    Sorry laughing at the visuals there

    Trainer at our barn starts everything Western, then changes tack if needed once they are going softly...I really did enjoy watching him doing spins on a youngster the other day, he was spinning around on that back foot real nice...only trouble is he is a Irish Draft in for starting for English...once he stopped him spinning then he starts broncing, first time I have seen A with a fistful of mane..Seems when the owner said he had put a couple of rides on, and it dodn't go well, he wasn't joking!
     
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  9. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    I know people who don't teach lesson horses to back up, or if they knew it they don't reinforce it. Reason being they don't want the horse to go backwards with a lesson kid.
     
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  10. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Click to expand cuz my other replies are there, somehow.
    You don't teach spins in the first 90 days. You teach stepping under itself on the ground and in the saddle, but you don't ask for speed, just that they do it properly.
     

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