VERY strong horse

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by RachelB47, Mar 7, 2019.

  1. RachelB47

    RachelB47 Registered

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    My horse is extremely strong at all gaits. Currently have him in a coronet ported kimberwick...he used to respond to it well but not it’s like a rock. Any suggestions? The only one I’ve tried so far is a loose ring Waterford. I hate the idea of bitting up a horse, and I get every horse is different I’m just trying to see what people have found success with. We do very little to no jumping, as he had surgery therefore jumping career is over. I’m aware it might not be a bit issue, I’m open to all suggestions/willing to try different things
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
  2. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    Given you said the bit use to work & now does not - that leads me to believe the classic thought process of you have a training issue not a bit issue. If you do not change how you are riding him & training him, you will be forever bitting up as he his mouth becomes duller and duller.

    You really need an in person coach/trainer who has dealt with this sort of thing with success. The horse is missing some education for sure, as is the rider.

    Best of luck!
     
  3. RachelB47

    RachelB47 Registered

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    I will be speaking with the person who has been leasing him, as I have not been the one riding him. Maybe some simple patience and retraining will help reverse this along with a trainer. Thank you!
     
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  4. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    It absolutely will providing the training is correct and the leaser is open to the idea & has enough patience.
     
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  5. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    The bit is not the brake on the horse.
     
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  6. peg4x4

    peg4x4 Senior Member

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    Training is the brakes
     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    What is the horse's background and training? What style of riding are you riding him in? What's your experience level? Do you get riding lessons frequently?

    What do you mean by 'strong'? He pulls on the reins? How? Steadily, all the time, the same amount, or does it get more and more as the ride continues?

    Do the reins slip through your fingers so he winds up with more and more rein? Does his head get lower and lower and his neck more and more stretched down and nose forward as your ride continues?

    Or is his contact unsteady, so that he pulls, then stops pulling and you have no rein contact, then starts pulling again? Does he toss his head up and down, or hold it in one position?

    Does he try to put his head down? Or push his nose more forward?

    What do you do when he is pulling? How do you correct him? And what is his response to that correction?

    Keep in mind that if he is a show jumper or dressage horse, he is SUPPOSED to be 'strong.' Because in fact, 'strong' in the bridle does not mean pulling, it means pushing a lot of energy to the bit, which is good.

    Contact is not bad for many kinds of riding, neither is the horse pushing to the bit.

    Keep in mind that the horse may not be pulling at all. He may be doing what he was trained to do and you're not balancing him.

    When a horse PULLS he isn't just pushing a lot of energy to the bit, he's pushing LESS energy to the bit, he's laying his weight on the bit. The contact feels dead and heavy, and horses do this because they are not balanced, that's not their fault, it's up to the rider to balance the horse with half halts(which use all the aids - seat leg and rein, not just rein).

    Half halts are NOT about getting a stronger bit to knock the horse off the bit(doing that can never actually balance a horse), but about encouraging the horse to take a bigger, more supportive step forward under his body with his hind legs, still push energy to the bit and to modulate his contact by simply becoming more flexible, not to drop the rein contact,
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2019
  8. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    If you've a lease with him, it might be a good time to revisit this.
     
  9. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    The horse needs training/retraining. If he's getting stronger, he's not being ridden well and is defending himself. Go LIGHTER and work out his issues with him.
     
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