Vaccination Frustration

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by palogal, Apr 29, 2018.

  1. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    One of my horses reacted to his shots this year and never has before. Anybody else have this problem this year and not others? With the bipolar weather this year, my horses have been more sneezy, snotty. and allergy sensitive (so have I), which I assume is the reason for this reaction.

    He's not lethargic or off his feed or anything. Just a small soft swelling at the injection site and he's a little tender there. The vet is not concerned, so I guess I'm not either. He got his shots yesterday, I noticed the swelling this morning when I fed and it was much better at dinner time tonight.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
  2. stb_chance

    stb_chance Senior Member+

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    I vaccinated 42 horses this year with a five way plus wnv and over half of them had mild to moderate swelling at the injection site. This is abnormal for my herd. Typically just a few will have mild swelling. Same vaccine and same routine as other years. They all got over it in a few days, but still! I feel your pain!
     
  3. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    Well that makes me feel better. I guess this is just a weird year.
     
  4. OldGreyMare

    OldGreyMare Senior Member

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    My mare Lucy is very sensitive to shots, we have to space out her's and each one she also get's an antihistamine shot as well.

    If you have never had any reactions to the shots before now, it may be a good idea to talk to your vet about what brand they are using and if they have had any other equine owners call in with the same responses as your herd showed.

    One year our vet had horses react to a new mixture of a particular shot by Fort Dodge. I called and they explained when they called the company they were told that a certain batch was "new" as far as how they made it so the company was watching and recording who called in.
     
  5. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    I had no reactions this spring with any of mine, but we are having a very late spring. They still have winter fuzzies, and pollen is running behind.
     
  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Mild swelling at the injection site is not really a reaction. It's more likely unavoidable injection error. A tiny little bit of air at the tip of the needle is all it takes to cause that.
     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Agree with manes. Unfortunately it's very easy to get a little air into the skin, or a little bit of bacteria or dirt. Especially if you use one needle per horse.
     
  8. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    It’s gone down some again this morning, so I guess I’m not worried about it. He’s willing to stretch is neck all directions and is showing no abnormal behavior.
     
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  9. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    I guess so, 2 needles for two shots. He’s never done this before but i did notice a spot less noticeable on one of my other ones this morning that I never would have spotted if I wasn’t looking for it.
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Suggestions follow:

    Don't use two needles for two shots. Use two needles for one shot. Using one needle per shot brings contamination into the injection site.

    Needles are cheap. Infected injection sites are not. Use one syringe for each horse, don't reuse them.

    Pick the injection site very carefully. Use your outspread hand with the bottom forward edge of your palm at the point of shoulder and choose the point at the tip of your middle finger(usually).

    If the area around the injection site has long hair, clip it short. If the mane is long, tie it up on the other side of the neck.

    Do not shake up the vial with the vaccinating agent in it. If it has bubbles in it, let it set until the bubbles are cleared. Sometimes tapping the vial very gently will help.

    Then wash the injection site and a very generous area around it with Dove, Ivory or other mild soap, treated potable water and a clean towel. Then rinse off all the soap and water, and scrub the area with a large piece of cotton soaked in alcohol (non winter green alcohol, just plain alcohol), keep going, getting fresh cotton, until you have a completely clean piece of cotton. Take another large piece of cotton that's dry, and rub away as much alcohol as possible. Keep turning the cotton so a clean area is against the neck.

    Wash your hands, tie up your hair, put on examination gloves. Don't touch any surfaces with your gloves. Use one needle to draw the agent from the vial. Throw that needle away(bend it and break it later) and put a fresh, clean needle on the syringe.

    When you inject, put it in very swiftly, ALMOST forcefully, very straight, very perpendicular to the horse.

    Then give the shot, being very sure that you have tapped the syringe sharply and dripped a drop or two out of the needle before you give the shot, so that there is no air and no air bubbles in the needle or syringe.

    If you are using something that you have to pull back with, be very sure you don't introduce any air into the syringe or vial, and try to pull back a minimum, just til you see a little blood.

    Then pull the needle out keeping the syringe very straight. Bend and break that needle. Put the syringe and broken needles in a sharps box with a narrow opening and put the sharps box away where a child can't access it. Don't reuse syringes.

    You don't want to do all that? Then the most important things are to swab the site with alcohol, to use two needles for each injection and to use one syringe for one shot on each horse.
     

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