Unwilling to keep the right canter lead suddenly

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Ziast, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    She never even asked what I'm feeding, she has no idea if I'm shoving lbs of grain down his throat or giving him a little bit of grass cubes. He's not getting any corn. No, I haven't talked to the other boarders, I don't usually run into them in the evenings. How is feeding like a quarter of the minimum feed rates of a handful of different feeds going to help him move better?
     
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  2. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    She sounds like a wackadoo. Bummer.
     
  3. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    So many of the feeds are corn based like Nutrena and Purina's lines. Corn does affect a horse's movement. I even have proof with my gelding. It affected his right hind and right lead since he was on corn based grains for so long. But, have seen it with all my friends horses that we switched including a PSSM1 horse. They were on various corn feeds, Nutrena Safe Choice Original, Purina Strategy, Nutrena Safe Choice Senior, Bomgaars Senior, and oats with flaked corn lightly added, meaning just a few flakes of it per cup. Which even that small amount affected my horse.

    But, in her case she doesn't say why to change or even ask what you feed to even make a good decision that you aren't feeding right or not.
     
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  4. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    I'm not even feeding him any kind of pellet or prepared feed. His old feed did, but it's been a month or two now.

    I mostly got a response of "I've been doing this a long time and this works" type of reasoning. When I asked about the low fees rates, I was told you don't need very much to see a change.
    I need a little more reasoning than that to make me overhaul what I'm doing.
     
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  5. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    In my horse's case and many of my friends it was a fast change getting them off of a corn based diet. But, I knew what they were feeding. I have had others have their horses on a non corn grain with issues and I couldn't help them feed wise because they were already on a good feed. I'm just learning about feeding an IR horse with supplements like flax, magnesium and chaste berry. None I have ever fed before. My friend's PSSM1 horse we did add magnesium because that is a common one to add for a horse like hers that is super spooky/scared. And dealing with his PSSM I have found each horse works differently with this disease.
     
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  6. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Go find someone else, as @bellalou said, she's a little wackadoodle. I can't imagine a bodyworker not laying a hand on her myself and suggesting feed changes when she didn't even know your regimen.
     
  7. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    Yea, I'm talking to another lady. A friend has used her for several horses and I used her once a couple years ago. Don't have a date yet, but hopefully next week.

    Or a coworker gave me another name if this one doesn't happen.
     
  8. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    There are a great many situations in which a horse is eating corn but the corn is not causing the problem the owner sees.

    Many horses eat corn, soy and other 'problem feeds' with absolutely no problem.
     
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  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It's not going to help him at all. It's a goofy feeding plan and makes no rational sense. Calf manna isn't really my choice of horse feeds(though I hear they now make a horse feed). This whole idea that this feed causes 'inflammation' and that feed doesn't, and this feed makes all horses lame and that feed doesn't, is just bizarre. Don't know where it got started.

    It's not at all clear that his diet has anything to do with this in the first place. It doesn't make sense. But then neither does she.

    Never, ever ask anyone to change a horse's feed to fix something without first understanding what the horse is getting.

    Based on what you describe, the best guess anyone could make is that he has a slowly progressing arthritis in his hind legs(probably hocks and/or ankles), and has had it for many years, and despite numerous different feeding plans over the years, it's simply progressed slowly, much as it usually does in most horses.

    I'd really want to see video of much more of the specific problem. I'd like to see a video of what happens when you try to get him to pick up the right lead, specifically in that moment of picking up the lead(closer up, showing a shot of the legs only, and then of the front and then the back end of the horse, as I can't see anything in these tiny videos with him at a distance or blocking the camera) and how he either gets into a trot or gets on the other lead, or whatever it is that he actually does when he doesn't want to keep the right lead. I'd like to see a video from the front and the rear, of you trying to get him onto the right lead, and ideally also of the moments when he doesn't hold the lead. I'd like to see exactly at what point in time he starts losing his lead (first time in the ride and then better, or worsens as the ride goes on, early on in that canter, or later, etc).

    I would want to get xrays taken and see how the hocks look. I'd want to compare those with previous xrays. I'd remove his hind shoes and make sure he doesn't go long between trims.

    And I'd really try to get him to move. He's barely cantering and he's dragging his feet, he's just coasting along not using himself. Moving more forward would make the horse either keep the lead or it would make any actual physical problems more obvious so they could be diagnosed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    There is absolutely no evidence that specific food ingredients cause 'inflammation' that causes lameness or discomfort, and in fact, there is absolutely no evidence that 'inflammation' is even something to be avoided.

    The Inflammatory Diet
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018

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