Unwilling to keep the right canter lead suddenly

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Ziast, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. PaintedRocket

    PaintedRocket Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    I know quite a few that are on Previcox and not because they're old and creaky, lol. The gelding at my place is on it--not for lameness, and he does move a lot better (a lot less stiff and more comfortably). He's not an old guy, not a young thing either, but not old and creaky with many, many years left in him.
     
  2. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    Previcox is not a last ditch effort type med. there are horses who live for years on it! You titrate down to the lowest controlling and that could be a dose every 3 days! My friend has had her horse on it for well over 6yrs. Yes hes retired now, but he wasn’t when she first started him on it. It’s COX 3 inhibitor used predominantly for osteo arthritis - so might be a big deal for your horse. That said, it will test positive if you’re showing, so it isn’t something he could stay if you’re showing.

    None the less, previcox isn’t going to fix what you have going on right now, but might be something to think about later on. For me, i’d exhaust all other options before going that route though - I’d rather inject every 6-12mths than start long term pain meds, but that’s just me personally. Once you’re at the point of long term pain meds - you’ll be at the point of showing just schooling shows if showing at all. I’m not quite sure this horse is near that point yet.........
     
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  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    If you look at his tendon behind where it ties into the hock, it's thick there, already and how old is he now? He just really isn't put together behind well enough for sustained athleticism.

    Once you start injections, they work less as time goes by because the body will recognize the chemical as a foreign substance and get better and better at getting rid of it faster. That's why injections are a last-ditch effort.

    Adequan IM or, if you have to get injections HA injections only. Save steroids for later, and buy some neoprene hock boots. They hold heat well.
     
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  4. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Breed shows and USEF Previcox/Equioxx is legal like bute. You can give up 57 mg 12 hours before showing.

    I would rather give that then injections every six to 12 months. And as horses age they start having other issues like metabolic ones as two other posters are dealing with and doing injections can easily cause laminitis. A friend of mine found out the first time her ten year old gelding got injections that he couldn't handle them because he was metabolic and he got laminitis. No rotation, but took a year before he could even attempt to ride him and then still has set backs so far every three months with an abscess. The laminae was obviously still damaged.
     
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  5. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    I don't think retirement would help him. Anytime he gets long periods off work or periods of non productive work he gets worse, not just his joints but his whole musculature. He's actually been moving 10x better in the last few months since we moved. I think I just need to re approach how I'm working him. I have accepted he's not going to be a long term competitive partner, which really sucks because his mind is to die for. Such a great personality. I'm not in a place to buy a second horse at the moment, especially considering I just sold my second horse for that reason. It'll be in the cards for the future though. Maybe another zippy little QH.
    At least he's quiet enough that if I had to lease him out to a beginner he'd do fine.

    Good to know it can be long term. I agree I don't think it's right for this stage, but definitely to keep in mind. I'm hoping to show more next summer, just Training Level, probably not rated, but we'll see where the winter takes us.
    He's 8. It really sucks that the people who bred him effectively messed him up by not taking care of any of his problems at birth. At least he'd only have to deal with his natural conformation, not prematurely fusing hocks and contracted tendons.

    Haven't heard back from the Osteo or MT yet.
     
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  6. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Has he been tested for PSSM? I'm thinking he is not a stock breed so more likely to have a variant of PSSM2. Your description of how he is after time off is a classic sign of PSSM.
     
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  7. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    Got an appointment with the bodyworker for Tuesday. My MT isn't taking appointments anymore, unfortunately. In the meantime I'm going to take it easy, long rein walks, straight line trots.

    I found Voltarin at the store, used that last night. Put it on then put on his hocks boots. Not much heat in there after I took them off, but it's not a heating topical so it makes sense. I've ordered some of those reusable hot packs, I'll stick them in his hock boots to help him warm up. From what I read, Voltarin doesn't pass as easily through horse skin, but also read the warning labels that adding heat will increase absorption, so it might balance out.

    I've thought about PSSM before but ultimately decided not. His muscles don't get sore or hard or anything that isn't explained by him being arthritic. I say he doesn't do well with time off because he loses muscle mass fast. He keeps his wind great, just not muscle. But honestly, he doesn't get time off so I don't have lots of case studies.
     
  8. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Maybe join the PSSM forum on Facebook and read the stories about PSSM horses to decide if might need to be tested. There might be other symptoms he has that you didn't know could also by PSSM related. Just plain attitude is a symptom. Horse I used to own that later was tested and is positive for PSSM1, also wouldn't be surprised if he also had a variant of PSSM2, I used to call stubborn. He was also grumpy all the time.

    This was him before we knew he had when he was nine. He always had to be pushed to canter correctly as you can see in the beginning in this video.

    [video]


    Then him at 17 when he started getting spooky and actually scared every time he came out of his little pen with shelter. He only wanted to be in his own little bubble. That parked out stance he does is also a PSSM symptom.

    [video]
     
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  9. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    In addition to PSSM, If you are in an area where Lymes if common, test for that. April's issue was mostly muscle stiffness and crabbiness.
     
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  10. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    I haven't watch your videos since I'm at work. Grumpy and attitude are just about the last words I'd use to describe Jules. I wouldn't even call him stubborn. No weird stances or usual behaviors. As you can see in my videos. he's very cordial and cooperative. He needs lots of reminder to listen to my leg, but when I ride him right he gets much better.

    Lyme is quite uncommon around here. Ticks are not native here, but have been moving. I believe every positive case in the province has been acquired elsewhere. I've never seen a tick in the wild, actually.
     

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