Unwilling to keep the right canter lead suddenly

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Ziast, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    Could be ulcers, teeth issues, or poor abdominal engagement leading to low back and SI pain. With poor abdominal engagement, the lumbar spine and SI joint will be more susceptible to shearing forces and pain, especially with bend, and if they are already irritated secondary to the other painful joints, it could have certainly been aggrevating despite just walking. I've been dealing with similar with my mare. The hocks are sore, making low back and SI sore, and the only way to help is abdominal engagement, but it's difficult because she's out of shape so then working on working on the abdominals is irritating... :confused:
     
  2. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    His fresh is more snorty, fancy. These times he's has a clearly unhappy face on. He really doesn't get fresh anyway.
    Hm, could be.

    Teeth were done a few months ago. Ulcers seem unlikely, but not impossible. He has hay 24/7, low grain feed. Not girthy or sensitive. But the previcox and steroids could have caused something. I have 30 days of pop rocks of needed.

    We just injected the SIs, so I hope that's not it, but he was reactive over them last I checked. Definitely has poor abdominals though, always has. I'm going to do a couple days a week of in-hand work how that I've done lessons again.

    Put him back on Previcox? Might take the edge off enough to work the muscles.
     
  3. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Unless you injected an anaesthetic, and you probably didn't, he could still be sore there.

    "We just injected the SIs, so I hope that's not it"
     
  4. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    My horse actually gets ulcers when he is doing less work.
     
  5. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    Was talking to my friend about it today and I remembered that he doesn't like to flex to the left when doing in-hand flexions, which is the same direction he first started chomping when we were walking circles with a light inside bend (tho he chomped both directions during the lesson). When flexing to the left, he will get to a point then flip his head up and away. To the right he does it quite well with no protest. Idk if it means something or if he's just stiffer that way. He was doing that before the rest of this stuff happened.

    I've started him back on Previcox and will mention it to my vet next time we talk.
     
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  6. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    My vet never emailed me back about the chomping and stuff. Since the Previcox the chomping is markedly decreased. Still happens, but it's only ever once or two chomps and when asking for more difficult things. No more chomping when I pick up my reins or ask for easy bends. Last time I did the flechie-droit to the left, he did one or two chomps, so I let him step out of it, then set him up again and he didn't chomp after that and was way lighter in the hand. So something must be bothering him at least a little bit. I don't know if that would communicate directly with the right side. It would think if it was something like ulcers, adding more NSIADs would make the pain worse rather than better.

    I took a video of my ride last night and it makes me want to cry. He clearly does not want to use that right leg, and this is with 3 weeks of Previcox. I thought he started feeling a little more hitchy last week. During my last lesson we did W/T transitions in-hand, so I was up at his shoulder looking back and he seemed not to be stepping through as well, but it's a bad angle to judge from. Since I'm not lunging him at all, it's hard to see the change.

    On the upside, he seems to be picking the leg up better, he just doesn't step forward with it. He's still picking up both legs higher when picking his feet, rolling all the way over, and is antsy to stand when cross tied. His walk has lost some of that easy swing forward, trot transition isn't as quick, but he is still trotting from my seat so he's not completely shut down on that. Start of the ride he was really short, then gets better, but when doing trot transitions he really skips when that right hind it's the one to push off with.

    I'll upload the video, but it's still uploading off my phone since none of my cables will transfer files off my phone (wtb cables that aren't damaged). So I'll do that tonight.

    I'm going to look for another vet to come out. Not that my vet isn't doing good, but I'm getting really concerned we haven't ultrasounded that stifle and are treating too conservatively. I could get an appointment with their ultrasound guy, but think I'm going to look at a different clinic for a second opinion. He didn't seem too concerned about an ultrasound when he looked at the xrays, despite saying he has "damaged and stressed meniscus and ligaments". If he actually has a tear and what I've been doing is making him worse, I'm going to be sick.

    :cry:
     
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  7. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    I can't remember if it has been checkey or not. The way he moves now, lifting the hind legs higher but not stepping under himself, reminds me of the way a horse walked that had been diagnosed with ringbone...
    But what I am picturing is a horse really hiking the hind legs up. I am sure that would have been noticeable under saddle.
    I don't know if it still might be worth to check for it?
     
  8. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

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    He's not been checked for ringbone in the hind legs. Could add that to the list of potential things. With his contracted tendons he is upright in his hind fetlocks too, bust not as severe as the fronts.

    He doesn't hike his hinds up really high, just higher than is historically typical for him. He's still a toe dragger.

    I'm sending off an email to another vet soon. Who ever I get out, I'm absolutely going to have an ultrasound and have them check his neck.

    I'm also having the farrier put on Tim snow pads next week. To see if it helps the arena footing balling up.
     
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  9. uncanny580

    uncanny580 Senior Member

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    I don't know who you are using for a vet right now, but have you looked at getting someone that is more specialized in Lameness out?

    I'm sorry you are going through this. Its so frustrating when you know something is wrong but can't find the right answer.

    A friend just had a vet tell her that her horse was toast, after flexing its hocks and it was sore. They didn't flex anything else, didn't do any other sort of diagnostics, nothing. Took the horse to an other vet and they did all sorts of testing and figured out what was actually wrong with it - which was not career ending at all!
     
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  10. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    I agree with getting a lameness specialist involved. I am blessed to have a GREAT one, and he is my go too for any lameness type issues. He is more expensive than other vets, but he gets stuff figured out a LOT faster, and is able to remedy it quickly.
     
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