Unwilling to keep the right canter lead suddenly

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Ziast, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Messages:
    6,432
    Likes Received:
    6,268
    The rules will most likely call it the horse version, Equioxx.

    Sorry the news isn't the best. We just sold my daughter's horse as a little girl's.w/t horse because it appears her hock she injured six years ago is done.
     
  2. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    3,875
    Likes Received:
    5,375
    I'm also sorry it wasn't the best news, but it is good that you now have a good idea about what is going on and how to proceed.

    Obviously your vet's recommendations trump mine, however one of the best things to support a joint when ligaments might be damaged or dysfunctional is to strengthen the surrounding muscles. I sure wish we had more DPTs practicing on horses in North America! I would avoid tight turns, circles, etc in gaits faster than walk, which at this point would likely be more irritating and damaging than anything. Walking on uneven or soft ground may be something to ask you vet about, because it can improve proprioception and joint stability up the chain. That would likely be my number one thing to start on, grading the levels of instability with his improvement. Gentle hills at walk may be something else to ask about for strengthening, and using some backing and crossing midline behind (TOF) in hand or gently undersaddle. In time when there is improvement, you'd start adding corners in trot and canter, as well as circles and figures in trot and canter. That would be my plan, or at least the ideas I'd be discussing with my vet :)
     
  3. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,941
    Likes Received:
    1,874
    The vet hasn't said anything negative about his return to work after treatment, so I'm staying optimistic. I realize this is definitely going to impact his long term soundness more than just his hocks would have, but if we can get the inflammation down, irap works to heal the joint, and I get the joint stabilized we should be good.
    Yea, agree 100%. From the start the vet said the muscles need to be stronger. I've been trying to go outside as much as I can, but it gets dark so early and its colder now so I can only go out on weekends pretty much. Lots of fields to walk in with various grades in hills and once we get more snow it will be a better workout to walk through. Now that I know the extent of damage, I'm going to back off the work inside, less laterals and circles. More straight line trot, transitions, pole work, and rein back. He learned to back up over a pole the other day. We do in-hand work as well like shoulder in and I might talk to my trainer about doing some in-hand only lessons. I read an article that suggested isometric exercises like picking up the opposite foot for 30 sec to force him to fully support himself with that leg, and tail pulls towards the effected side to give resistance.

    I think the diet change I made a while back has started working or something. I swear his topline is looking better despite not getting the kind of work it normally would have taken to make an improvement there. He's less bony through his lumbar and SIs.
     
  4. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,941
    Likes Received:
    1,874
    He got his injections last Thursday, so we are 4 days post injection. Today was the first time have ridden him in 11 days. I decided to give him the rest because he was getting heavy, rooting at the trot, and chomped the bit once.

    Mixed results from my ride today. Just did walk/trot in the indoor. First, I think his stifles feel better. I noticed right when I got on that my hips were being pushed forward more. Then at the trot, I was coming much closer to the pommel than usual in my rise. Started off feeling pretty ok.

    Then he was not. A. Happy. Camper. :cry:
    About half way through (so only about 10 minutes in), he started chomping the bit and ducking behind the bit. I tried to adjust my riding a bit, really focus on my contact. Didn't make a difference. Stopped and checked my bit since I just got him a bigger one. Raised it one hole. No change. This is so astoundingly out of character. He does not duck and he doesn't chomp. I took a video tonight, and you can see he moves worse the longer the ride goes.

    After I got off I checked his SIs. Very sore. Sore enough that I got reactions out of both sides, and I suck at getting reactions from palpating. SI makes sense with the chomping.

    SIs sore from compensating from sore stifles from the injections? He did not get any bute afterwards as anti inflammatories are supposed to reduce the efficacy of the IRAP, but I saw him all 3 days after and he didn't look sore at all. He's not on Previcox yet either.

    New source of pain showing up now that the stifles aren't so sore? Do I talk to my vet about injecting the SIs?

    I have previcox but no bute. Vet was going to leave bute but we both forgot by the end of the appointment. I could give him previcox for the next week or so and that should help if it's from compensation. No riding above the walk either. Long rein walks.

    I need to get my body worker out again too, but if he's so reactive, I don't know how much good it'll do. I'm going to send my vet an email, but in the meantime ...:willynilly:
     
  5. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    3,875
    Likes Received:
    5,375
    Hmm SI's will often get sore with soreness down the chain. Potentially, if the stifles are feeling better, perhaps the hocks got more stressed (if he has been more willing to use and load the hocks) leading to SI pain. Otherwise, there's the possibility that the dysfunction has always been at the SI's... It may also be down the chain, but with so much time compensating for the arthritic hocks, it makes sense that things moved up the chain.

    A really good stretch you can do is a hip flexor stretch. You want to use your palm on the coxal tuberosity (the point of the hip) and direct the force toward the tail. Do one side at a time. Start super gently because they are probably very tight. Try for a 30 second hold for 3 sets if he'll tolerate it. Stretching the hip flexors will take some strain off the lumbar spine and sacrum. When walking, you want to engage his core as much as possible to stabilize his low back.

    Here's my cruddy drawing of the stretch, and it's your palm (the fleshy, medial side/hypothenar eminence) on the point of the hip.
    IMG_20181112_143323_347-01.jpeg

    Hopefully it's just soreness and a mild setback!
     
  6. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    20,294
    Likes Received:
    17,839
    ^ that's a good stretch for the Psoas too @DocsLglyBlonde - but for Psoas, you want 2 people and you want to both do the stretch at the same time on each side. :)
     
    DocsLglyBlonde likes this.
  7. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    Messages:
    6,432
    Likes Received:
    6,268
    Zias-Are you out with like chiro issues?

    For Foxy and me we tend to mirror each other. Like the other day he got sore in his loins so haven't ridden him since Saturday. That day I got a really bad migraine, just had my hair cut the other day and the new hair stylist actually mentioned how tight my neck was, with the kaleidoscope vision which freaked me out.

    Foxy got his feet done today and the farrier mentioned he was sore when he got him out. Well, I was just going into my chiro and guess what, I was super out, way more than normal out. So one of us got the other sore. I think it was me. I bought one of those Back on Track blankets for me and quit using it after a few days when I woke up the other day and could barely walk at first my hips were so tight. I used my tens machine and Aleve to help me recover.

    I plan on riding him lightly today and see how it goes for both of us.
     
  8. Ziast

    Ziast Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,941
    Likes Received:
    1,874
    I'll start doing that stretch.

    Heard back from my vet. Going to start the previcox, walk only, and try to get the chiro back out. That should help if its compensation. If he's not improved after, then another vet appt.

    I'm running out of time before everyone is closed for Christmas.

    Yea, I've got some chiro things myself. I know my right hip tends to be forward and I have a tight left shoulder. Nothing to the point of making me crippled. I know that doesn't help him, but he wasn't ridden for almost two weeks and he's worse than ever.

    I should have gone for that BoT black Friday deal. I don't have anything for him other than wraps.
     
    DocsLglyBlonde likes this.
  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    25,096
    Likes Received:
    15,472
    Sorry about the diagnosis. Hopefully PT, medication and rest will help a lot.
     
  10. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    3,875
    Likes Received:
    5,375
    Sorry, iliopsoas = hip flexors :) I have seen it done bilaterally simultaneously, but there's really no need for it imo, and doing one side at a time makes it much easier to do if you're by yourself. They are independent muscles on each side, so I don't see a reason you can't stretch one side at a time, but I'm open to other opinions, because I'm much more familiar with human than horse anatomy :p I've seen great results doing these with Jess though!
     

Share This Page