Ulcers AND laminitis-aka, THE SEVENTH CIRCLE OF HORSEY HELL

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Touch the Sky, Oct 1, 2018.

  1. Touch the Sky

    Touch the Sky Senior Member

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    That's why I started him back on the topline extreme, I had planned to start getting him back into work this month. Hopefully that will still be the plan once he has his feet done
     
  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I think that this laminitis isn't about his being overweight. There are other factors that can lead to laminitis - disease, lameness (weight is shifted off a lame leg causing one leg to carry too much weight and a sort of 'mechanical' laminitis results). Were he mine I'd have him tested for PPID and Insulin Resistance.

    Extreme Topline isn't going to make muscle form. In this type of horse the key is being in work, but he's got to be sound before that can happen.
     
  3. Touch the Sky

    Touch the Sky Senior Member

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    The topline extreme is just a protein supplement to assist in the development of muscle. I have used it before and like my results so I figured it wouldn't hurt to add it in.
    Hopefully the farrier will be out this week and once he is sound again we can to work on getting him back in shape
     
  4. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Agree he does need to be tested for IR and Cushings. His neck reminds me of Foxy's when he atrophied last year and he is IR.

    Do you know if he rotated? Usually they aren't ready to be ridden again until a year later when a whole new hoof grows out. My friend's horse who got his, but also had signs prior of issues, was tipped over when he got injections for the first time. Took 12 months before he was rideable, but still up and down because he gets abscesses all the time. They are getting better though, no more bloody ones.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Is it both front feet? Or just one? Were the feet xrayed?

     
  6. Touch the Sky

    Touch the Sky Senior Member

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    The vet called me a little bit ago and there was no rotation! I'm so relieved. She said shoes and pads should do the trick and he should be good to go! She is sending me copies of the x rays tomorrow so I can have them on hand if I should need them.
    On another note, I had his left knee x rayed as well (the one that was SUPER winky because of the way his feet were) as I was concerned about arthritis or possible bone chips.
    ALL CLEAR! she said there at no signs of anything wrong at all, and that his knee is perfect. He has just gotten used to standing weird and compensating for his feet. We have been doing several stretches and exercises to help with that, and she said to continue them and eventually he'll slip out of the habit.
     
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  7. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    As has been mentioned, alfalfa is usually lower in sugar than most grass hay. If you can only feed once per day, try giving him a ration of alfalfa cubes or pellets, I suggest pellets, and a ration of hay in a slow feeder net and/or several nets placed in different locations in his pen. They will usually eat the pellets first, and it takes a while for one to eat 10lbs or so of pellets, then start o the hay. A combination of pellets and hay last longer than feeding straight hay for my animals at least. I was sad when my oldster could no longer chew hay and had to go to straight pellets because we are back to 3 feedings per day. I'm pretty old school with feed and believe there is nothing better for a hard keeper than good alfalfa. It is good for equines with ulcers too so there's that.
    I do not soak pellets but will at least moisten cubes. If his teeth are good and he does not bolt his feed, he can propably safely eat dry cubes but..........
    Good luck!
     
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