1. JOIN the world's largest horse forum! Chat and learn from other experts about horse training, breeding, health, showing, riding, contests and use our free horse classifieds. Register Here

Ugh,disunited canter both directions

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by RG NIGHT HEIR, Mar 7, 2017.

  1. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2016
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    307
    I finally got my horse rehabbed enough to start some sort of training.He's a former Amish cart horse that was so one sided he couldn't canter to the left.With time he has evened out ,his hooves are angled evenly now ,he had a severe dished left front ,that is now almost invisible,,his body looks and feels symmetrical.Chiro monthly as he has some neck issues.Last month he had a rib out,which was a new one.
    I moved to a boarding facility where a trainer will help me to find his potential.I'm not stuck with having to have a "performance" horse,as I knew I will have horse with unknown rideability.Over the last few months I started to develope softness as his mouth was pretty hard.He now bends in both directions with light rein touch.Walking poles,I can walk him over and around obsticle with just legs and weight.
    To tell you all the truth I couldn't tell if my horse was crossfiring maybe he didn't before?.When I worked him in the roundpen I did not just let him run around with his head turned to the outside as most horses do.
    Right now my trainer just wants to do groundwork with him to see where he is and what needs to be addressed.He still is a bit nervous being in a new environment( 2 weeks) so he still runs with his head up and back thru and crossfiring per my trainer.
    Is it possible that it's just his body position for now?
    Chiro is again coming in 2 weeks,will ask the vet.
    Can a horse be trained out of crossfiring if body issues is being ruled out? I do understand that crossfiring is usually do to imbalance of the horse,equipment and/ or rider.
    What are your experiences with an issue like that?
    Fire away.....
     
  2. CodyChrome

    CodyChrome Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2017
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    88
    Well, if you have physical issues, those have to be eliminated first
    Then, once you are sure that is not the problem, consider you are trying to make a driving horse into a riding horse-a horse that has been driven , versus ridden, so no leg aids for impulsion, and also more bit contact, thus the hard mouth
    He has most likley, having watched Amish where I grew up, mainly driven at an extended trot, and hardly if ever cantered
    If physical reasons are ruled out, cross firing occurs when a horse is not driving up correctly from behind, and since he has never been ridden much with legs, he does not know how to canter correctly.
    Lunging, done incorrectly, will facilitate cross firing. If the horse is on alunge line, pulling, and not being driven up from behind, he is dumped on his front end, with hips popping out of lead
    Yes, you need to go right back to ground work, and then riding, putting whole body softness and implusion on him, riding with more legs then hands, getting him god and supple at the slower gaits, before ever trying to canter him
     
    Idrivetrotter likes this.
  3. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2013
    Messages:
    6,909
    Likes Received:
    12,131
    I'd have to see what is going on. Could be fixable and could be neurological. Could be switching due to imbalance or pain. Could be something rider is doing.
    Do you ever leg yield into the canter? That can help. If you are up to it, post or pm a video so we can give more accurate help.
    Just to be clear, is he cross firing under saddle and/or being lunged ? What happens if you just free lunge him?
     
  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Messages:
    30,845
    Likes Received:
    60,366
    Cart horses that were checked up too high tend to go hollow and if they have bad conformation on top of that they tend to crossfire. You need to build the muscles in the back end. Back the horse a lot: through gates, in and out of the stall. Over things, etc. Also do inclines as the thrust from behind helps build those muscles.

    Get the horse to drop his head, teach a heads down cue and whatever you do on the ground, have him drop his head to do it.

    Another thing is a REALLY GOOD Blacksmith who can square the toes behind and slow down the breakover so he doesn't reach so far.
     
  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    15,747
    Likes Received:
    9,299
    No idea. Still unsound, off balance(meaning too much weight on the forehand), or just plain nervous. Could be any of those.
     
  6. savethewhaley

    savethewhaley Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2016
    Messages:
    302
    Likes Received:
    361
    How old is this horse? This doesn't sound like a problem that is going to be an easy fix.
    How often is your trainer working with him?
    Crossfiring really is usually due to imbalance or pain. If something isn't off, either in training, balance, or conformation, there shouldn't be a reason for him to be hitting himself. Can you post confo pics?
    I know that crossfiring is not good, but is it causing him pain, meaning is he swelling up or cutting up his legs or anything? Does he wear bell boots? Sometimes we tend to make a big deal out of things that don't bother them- obviously you should try to get rid of the issue eventually.

    Edited to fix grammar issue.
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    15,747
    Likes Received:
    9,299
    Where is this horse expected to canter, and on how small a circle is he expected to canter? What's the footing like? Is he very anxious when he's trying to canter? Maybe it's as simple as bad footing and too small an area.

    Horses don't always cross canter because they're unsound or in pain. There can be many reasons.
     
  8. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    14,990
    Likes Received:
    12,434
    I'd be looking for a performance vet and get a thorough lameness exam.

    I'd be looking at SI, hocks, and stifles. I'd also consider his feet.
     
  9. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2016
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    307
    Thanks for all the replys.
    He is 14 years old.I don't canter him under saddle.Its in the round pen which is a large diameter one.
    I never noticed him being disunited either because I worked him with a lower head set and not free lunged him or I'm not able to tell.
    I had a recent lameness exam done because he felt off to me but could not visualize it.The vet checked and could not come up with anything,except when trotting his left ear would go back when posting on the left.My old trainer said it could be from his dished foot he had and still very so slightly has.
    Vet is coming out before farrier is due will check.
    He wears bell boots but he does not reach over.
    Can you actually r
    It's a large round pen with very good footing,not too deep .
    Yes he's still somewhat nervous being at a new place,so his head is up and his back is down.
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    15,747
    Likes Received:
    9,299
    uh...what?

    How large is large?
     

Share This Page