Twins or not?!

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Dona Worry, Sep 24, 2017.

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Twins or missing cow?

  1. Yes twins

    5 vote(s)
    83.3%
  2. Nope, missing a cow.

    1 vote(s)
    16.7%
  1. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    I have a prefresh with 37 cows in it.
    On friday, it was more, but three cows decided to pop.
    But FOUR calves were found.
    Now, the females were all claimed and attended by their moms when found, but nobody was claiming the lone boy.
    The nost likely candidate for twins is this girl (excuse the mud please)
    IMG-20170922-WA0001.jpg

    Kandied.
    Now, things that point to this theory:
    Has a history of twins--4 out of her 5 previous calcings were twins.
    She is about 10 days early.
    Dried herself off early, didn't bag up much, has been wider than a house.
    No other cow appears to have calved
    The other two cows are not likely twinning candidates.

    Things that refute it:
    She ALWAYS looks that big
    Vet check at 60 days found only one calf, I asked him to check specifically.
    The calves are BIG.
    No obvious indication the heifer she claimed (or either of the others) is sterile.
    (90% of all heifers born twon to a bull are sterile, the vulva is almost always noticable deformed)
    We have missed cows before ( usually in Septemer, when the barn is packed and we have multiple a day, and yes, it is always embarrassing)

    The heifer. Not exactly a textbook twin, she is vigorous and solid. Most twins have a delicate appearance. IMG-20170922-WA0000.jpg

    What do you all think? I am stumped.
     
  2. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    Do you keep all the prefresh together? No possibility little boy came under a fence? She doesn't look like the usual freemartin, if her parts appear normal, and she isn't a smallish one.

    We had twins ocassionally, the last time the mom abandoned one in the pasture and came up to the barn with the other one.

    Asked my husband, and he laughed and said, do a DNA test, lol. Sorry, but he thought it was funny, since it isn't his problem, and he is used to us talking about DNA tests for horses.

    Hope the momma, whomever it is, starts feeling maternal and feeds the little guy.
     
  3. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    All prefresh kept together in a barn well away from everyone else.
    Baby boy is just as hefty as the girl, both are bottle fed, as is the usual with dairy cows.
    I just can't make up my mind if they are twins or not! And if not. . . WHO IS THE MOTHER?!
     
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  4. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    Do you leave them at all on the cow? We had beefers, so different, tho a few dairy for house hold milk. Husband left them on for about 24 hrs, then bottle. But we always had less than ten dairy, nothing like your operation.

    Maybe the stork left it? It's a puzzle for sure, lol. Keep looking, my curiosity is peaked for sure.
     
  5. PyroTekNik333

    PyroTekNik333 Senior Member

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    Eesh, that does not look like a twin to me.
    Stranger things have happened of course but I would be having the remaining "bred" cows checked to see if any are open.
     
  6. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Nope. Dairy cows are famous for heing horrible mothers. They were never bred with any consideration for maternal instinct so while some are excellent mothers, others will not even bother to clean the calf a there are a few *coughcoughCELEBRITYcoughcough* that will actually try and kill the calf if not watched. All calves are removed and bottle fed colostrum within an hour of birth/discovery.
    It may sound cruel, but my calf mortality rate is 0.5 percent, most of which are birth defects and stillborns.

    The only dairy I know that brags about their 'humane' practice of leaving calves on the cow has a calf mortality rate of 50%.

    They wanted to buy replacement heifers from us last year.



    I said no.
     
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  7. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    I have bumped a calf (literally slow-motion punch a cow in the stomach until you hit a calf--super easy at nine months pregnant!) all likely and even a few unlikey candidates! No unusual discharge! No one suddenly flush with milk!
    :willynilly::willynilly::willynilly:
     
  8. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    You are not inhumane, hubby just did it because it was the way he learned. Old ways are not always the right way. As I said, we had just a few dairy, and luckily, all the mommas liked their babies.

    Beef cows are very protective, we didn't have to bottle feed very many, except when momma died or didn't produce enuf.

    It's the stork, I tell you.
     
  9. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    I gotta take a picture of the boy. He's a lil chunker.
    I keep checking the prefresh.
    NADA. :willynilly:
     
  10. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Bouncing baby boy! 20170924_190417.jpg
     
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