tw@t off lead rein, perfect on lead rein?

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Lisa Dam, Oct 12, 2017.

  1. Lisa Dam

    Lisa Dam Registered

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    I have a coloured gelding, rising four, on my yard that I ride twice a week to keep his schooling up while he mostly does lead rein rest of the week.
    He was originally broken in to compete in working hunter, show jumping, xc and dressage. But plans didn't go to plan and he ended up being a lead rein pony for the time being.
    At first he was foot perfect, he was figuring out ground poles, how to extend his trot, pick the right leg up in his canter transition and all that fancy stuff.
    But as soon as he got a taste for lead rein, he'd turned into a complete devil. He now bucks, spins, rears and bolts off lead rein, won't accept a contact, doesn't want to go forward, then doesn't want to stop. Lead rein was quickly stopped because his owner thought it was a health issue. Backed was checked, saddle checked, his feet, he got a lame test and scoped for ulcers. Everything comes back fine. He's 100% okay to continue.

    So he's put back into work, he's still an arsehole off lead rein, decided to try him on lead rein with a teenager riding so if he acts up, she could sit and circle him. And he's back to being foot perfect, There isn't much difference in the work load, his still does walk, trot and canter on lead rein (his owner can somehow run to his canter)
    Pony is 12.2hh so he isn't massive. But it's becoming a pain in the backside when I'm trying to school him.
    Is there any reason why this can happen?
     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Usually it's because they know who they can act up with and who they can't.

    If he takes off with you, “Great idea~!! let's gallop~!!“and keep him going. If he wants to slow down, don't let him until you say so. But, you have to have room, not be riding in a ring. He wants to dictate what he does or doesn't get to do and if not immediately corrected, he gets an inch, he will take a yard.
     
  3. SoutherngirlBR

    SoutherngirlBR Full Member

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    He needs to be told no. He is acting up because you are letting him. He was fine for the teenager because she told him who was in control. Next time he acts up make him stop and if she tries to gallop off turn his nose to your knee and make him go in circles till he gives to your hand. This is just the horse knowing he's in control. He was fine when you got him because his old owners were the boss of him but when he figured out yalls game he knew how to play you.
     
  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Punish behavior you don't want, immediately and significantly. Praise and reward behavior you like.
     
  5. Lisa Dam

    Lisa Dam Registered

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    He does the behaviour with anyone off lead rein, not just me, if the teenager rode him off lead rein he would of done what he does to everyone, Bolt, spin, buck and rear.
    I originally thought it was me and asked the owner to ride him, same thing happened to her.
     
  6. lucky_pine

    lucky_pine Senior Member

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    The advice everyone has given you still stands. He wants to act a fool, make him move and don't let him stop until you say so. Anyone who rides this pony needs to be on the same page and willing to shut down this behavior as soon as it starts.
     
    Arem likes this.

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