Trainer rules for Horse Clothes

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by bobo and horses, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. bnttyra

    bnttyra Senior Member

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    Back when I was showing APHA and had a full time trainer, they would like us to have the same color stuff but understood that wasn't always possible. They gave us discounts on items when they would buy for the whole group. But it was entirely up to each person and no one was told they "had to".
     
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  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I'm a conservative rebel, liberal minded. If you tell me I have to do this, nope. If it was something inexpensive such as matching wraps or bell boots and a suggestion, sure. I just am not into paying for their advertising, which is what it is..no matter their cohesive argument. If I was made aware of initially, that's different. Should be arbitrary IMO.
     
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  3. Sandra-A1

    Sandra-A1 Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Does the trainer have stall and tack room drapes to use when at the shows?
    Does he/she set up a lounge with signage and photos, along with a place to display the ribbons and trophies won at the show?
    If so, then there is no real need for all of the additional matching items.
    People who are really interested in who owned and trained a particular horse at a show WILL make the effort to find out. Most will follow the horse and ask who ever is riding or handling it who is the owner/trainer. If they are interested enough they will look for the trainer's stalls so they can talk to him/her.
    I can see more of a need for stall drapes than matching equipment for all of the clients.
    Personally, I want a trainer who is more interested in doing a good job and giving his/her clients fair value for their hard earned dollar.
    Showing is all about the performance of the client (if they are showing), their horse and the trainer.
    I want to see a trainer who is more interested in seeing their client successful and happy, than if they have a fancier show set up than anyone else at the show.
    Professional to me, means happy horses, a clean stable area with people doing their job, but still enjoying themselves.
    Your average horse owner, who is looking for a trainer to use, will usually think a super fancy set up at a show as belonging to a very expensive Trainer...not as a successful one.
    If you are being forced to by items that you do not really need and will only be used when at the show with that trainer.....find another trainer!
    I would not be surprised if that trainer loses clients (especially future ones) because of such a requirement.
     
  4. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    I said I was done, but Sandra A1, he does have all of the above. I will tell you this, on the quarter horse circuits, EVERYONE already knows who you are showing "with". There isn't a need for matchie matchie. Plus, everyone here is poo pooing me should know this is my adult daughter, not me, who is showing.
    Which, by the way, was made perfectly clear in the first post. Also, I have stated that she signed a contract, but NOWHERE in the contract was this mentioned.

    I believe this is his wife's ideas, as he stated it was his wife' s domain. Never before have I ever seen his clients with the matching tack. He is a well known trainer, produces good results, and if DD's first choice of a trainer had not relocated to Texas, she wouldn't be in this predicament. We have had several trainers over the kids careers, left sometimes, and never on bad terms. So, whoever warned us about being black listed, is so totally wrong. She is very serious about her riding, and the trainer was happy to have her in his barn. This is an exceptional young horse, and everyone has high expectations for her showing career.
     
  5. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    It's a different story when you're informed before you move to that barn that you are expected to buy all this stuff. Totally another to have this suddenly expected of you when it wasn't part of the original deal, as if it's no big expense. That's not being supportive of your client's interest.

    Future students can be required to buy this stuff, and those who want to can buy it, or find another barn, but, out of fairness, the trainer should have rental equipment they purchased themself for promoting g.......themself.

    The student gets nothing out of paying for this stuff. A person who owns a race horse would get purse money. There's not much money in riding horses at this level, so it's really not benefiting anyone but the stable, which the client has no monetary interest in.
     
  6. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Not sure how you compare hospital with a horse show barn.Health/Life compared to a volunteer hobby?
     
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  7. Compadre

    Compadre Senior Member

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    Geez, it's not an exactly precise analogy. Its just the first thing that came to mind, probably because I'm in a hospital. Ok, it's like flying in an airplane and having to buy a certain color seat cover. You're not paying for the seat cover, you just wanna get from point A to point B.
     
  8. Trubandloki

    Trubandloki Senior Member

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    You have a choice. You can choose to not train with or not show with this particular trainer and go with one that allows their people to go to shows with whatever equipment they want.
     
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  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Yeah, but she has a contract. Since it states nothing about expenditures for specialised accoutrements required for show days, the trainer has no legal way to enforce this "new rule".

    I can see them coming up with new contracts for everyone and abruptly ending all the old contracts, but otherwise, they're just alienating their own clientele, ruining what relationships they already have with those not lucky enough to easily afford this added expense, and depleting their own stable, thus their own income.
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    In fact, in dressage it's fairly easy because all the tack is so uniform to start with and goes along 'classic' lines anyway - leather halters and leads, etc. Most people already have pretty similar gear. Matching will probably be nothing more than a saddle cover, maybe a sheet, until you get really upmarket. Most of the 'bigger' trainers already have their tack stall curtains, etc. Though in the 'good old days' a lot of that stuff was home made or cheaply made locally...and for years we just didn't fuss much. Then people coming over from the show hunter world would be like, 'is THAT your tack stall???'

    And in fact, I kind of like it. I see the funny side of it if the barn is giving poor quality training, is pretty sloppy and pretentious and the customers are stomping out the door because they don't want to spend money on matching gear, and a lot of the hunter stuff I find totally over the top, but in a good barn, some of this is just a matter of being conscientious and having a plan and being a good horse person.

    Some dressage folk and jumper folk are notoriously...not interested in primping. Trainers like Joe Fargis and Steffen Peters are known for keeping coats and hats and other gear til they're literally falling to pieces. Some of those guys just aren't fussy about certain things, but that's not to say their barns are a mess, either.
     

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