Too young?

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Legacy08, Feb 24, 2019.

  1. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    Anyone who would sell a weanling to a new horse owner should be smacked upside the head.

    Do yourself and the horse a favor and sell him and buy yourself a been there done that horse.
     
  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    If you've no experience, you need to wait and have people that do, work with her. People with no experience wind up generally creating horrible training problems for green horses that are hard to undo. I don't want to be anything but honest with you, get a trainer. Those people that have volunteered, turn her over. I think you're way over your head. Speaking as someone who's no interest in seeing anyone hurt badly, please listen.
     
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  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    No sheet Sherlock.
     
  4. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    Harsh but true. You can't just "figure this out" you either need someone to help you in person consistently or you need to sell the horse.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Agree with the comment above that this is not something you 'figure out.'

    And as far as experience, you may have experience being around older horses but...I don't know how to say this without offending you more, but....you're in a really bad situation.

    I'm concerned that because of being overly concerned about proving yourself, you aren't really understanding how much of a problem you have on your hands, as well as how easily you could get hurt in this situation.

    Though quite often, it's the horse that ultimately suffers the most, and winds up a year or two old, adult sized, not halter broke, no other training and headed nowhere good. I've looked at so many of these horses in the last couple years. Some of them are in their teens and have never had medical care or hoof care. For sale, $400, will be put to sleep in a week if no one takes him. Oh, and, not sure how you'll get him home, he isn't trained to go in a trailer, either.

    Until they're trained, horses can't get medical care, hoof care, dental care, vaccines, worming.

    You're describing being 'trampled.'

    This is not a safe situation. The steps you have taken so far with this young horse....I can't say this without offending you - what you have done so far is extremely ill-advised and dangerous. The person telling you what to do is also very ill-advised, and you need to find someone who gives you better advice.

    You need frequent supervision, instruction, someone who tells you what to do, who you will listen to and do what you're told. And this person needs to also be able to step in and demonstrate what he or she means, and be able to train the horse so it is responding better before you try yourself to do things.

    This is not something you will figure out and learn on your own or from a video.

    And keep in mind that what you described - two people who 'offered to help' - I assume for free - those promises almost never happen, even if they do, they don't work out very well. Quite often people who offer free help know very little about young horses.

    You need to get instruction, on site, at your barn, with that horse, the trainer is in person, and that means you need to resolve yourself to do what a knowledgeable trainer tells you to do.

    Sorry, but that's the reality of it. You need a big wake up call. And you need help. In person, someone you pay to come there and work with you and the horse.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
  6. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Yes, we can all learn it. But we have to learn it from someone. We can't just learn it by doing it because we have to know what we're doing. It's not instinctive, working with horses, no matter what books and movies want us to believe.

    Learning by doing is a recipe for ruining horses. And that's not fair to the horse. Your horse is at an age where she is ripe for being ruined for life by inexpert handling, no matter how sincere your desire to do right by her.

    She needs a proper trainer and you need a trainer who will work with you too to teach you how to apply the training to Legacy. She needs proper, daily handling but it's impossible to explain on a message board how that would look because the handling is based on give and take, how the horse responds to the trainer and the trainer's timing and reaction to the horse.

    Please find a real professional trainer for this little girl. If you can't, the kindest thing you could do for her is to find her a home with someone who can.
     
  7. JStorry

    JStorry Senior Member

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    Plenty of people leave their youngens out with a hard until 2 before starting. If you want to keep this weanling that would be my advice to you. Find a place to board her with other yearlings where they have the basic handling for farrier, vet, etc. Then when she turns 2 send her out to a trainer. Or sell her and buy a broke horse.

    This isn't something you learn as you go. Teaching the wrong behaviors now sets this baby for failure as she grows up. Raising foals is a huge endeavour. Everything you are doing now sets the stage for this horses future.

    I raise my own. I handle them every day. I don't play with them. I give them time to run and play, to be a baby. They are solid respectful citizens but they are still young and need time to just be a young horse before the work starts.

    I worked for a breeder for years before I even considered raising my own. This isn't something you learn from a book or that you learn with the horse.

    I wish you luck, but please consider the horses needs and not just your feelings.
     
  8. Dream27

    Dream27 Senior Member

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    I have nothing more to add to the training aspect as I think everyone is pretty much hitting on that. But I would like to mention that the odds are VERY good that this horse is night blind, so please be aware of that and understand that in dusky or dark situations, your horse is most likely completely blind and may panic.
     
  9. GotaDunQH

    GotaDunQH Senior Member

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    Agree with the others.....you need competent help or someone will have to undo what you have done in the way of incorrect training at some point. Sadly, problem horses are created by humans...and then sent to auctions. Please do feed the auction fodder, and get a pro to work with this baby daily. While I admire you wanting to learn....babies are a WHOLE different ball of wax. You have a yearling who needs to be in a program NOW, before it becomes a dangerous and large 3 YO.
     
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  10. foxtrot

    foxtrot Senior Member

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    I agree with everything that's been said, especially about the horse likely being nightblind due to her pattern and the pink skin around her eyes. Many appaloosas with that pattern are very nervous precisely because they have vision issues.

    I just want to add one thing: please don't be offended about this. The thing anyone who's been in horses for any length of time will tell you is you really can't have much personal pride about it. I'm far far from an expert but I'm also not a novice. I've raised multiple baby horses and broke a few to ride. But I had a baby pony a few years back that was just not a good fit for me in any sense. I tried to make it work for a long time because of sentimentality. Eventually I sold him to a home more suited to him, because it was the most fair thing to the horse and for me.

    I learned a lot from that pony, I did learn how to communicate with him, but it was a constant battle of wills because I wasn't great at being what he needed. It wasn't fun, I wasn't the right person for him. Horses are meant to be fun... if you aren't having fun then the situation needs to change, for you and for the horse. Best of luck.
     
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