Too young?

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Legacy08, Feb 24, 2019.

  1. Legacy08

    Legacy08 Registered

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    Hello, So this is Legacy. She is my 10month old pure appleloosa who stands about 14.2 now. She comes from.a champion line where her dad was a champion at western training. When I first bought her she was 6months old. She is my first horse. Where I board her, the lady believes Legacy was taken from her mom at a early age.
    We kept her in the indoor arena for a month until vet gave the okay to be with other horses.
    When she was alone she was great she was respectful and then we introduced her to an adult mare and from there she runs from me, she tries to trample over me and dont allow me to even attach her lead rope.
    I left her alone to just try and be a baby with the adult mare.
    Now being 10months old I been working with her but she seems to only come to me for carrots lol
    Now my question is
    Should I continue to work with her now or continue to let her be baby till shes 1yr?
    The lady who I board from said to leave her be for a few more months.
     

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  2. CabterCrazy

    CabterCrazy Senior Member

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    It has nothing to do with being too young and everything to do with not respecting you. I suggest finding a trainer to come and instill manners in her and teach you how to work with her and handle her. Quit using carrots, that is a way to get her spoiled and learn to expect them.
     
  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Curious, why did you purchase a filly this age, without training, if you've no or little experience? Just curious what the back story is.
     
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  4. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Work with her. If you don't know what you are doing, consult a trainer.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Sounds like both you and the lady you talk to both have no experience with baby horses. It would be a good idea for you to get a professional trainer involved, one who is laid back and calm, but gets the job done with young horses. I don't mean to be rude but my gosh, it sounds like you do not have any decent guidance at all. You need help.

    This young horse needs to be halter broke, first of all. She's not halter broke. That's the first step.

    It is 100% normal for a young horse, paired up with a mare, especially after being removed from its mother and having had a month of isolation in an indoor arena, to 'run from you,' 'try to trample over you' and 'not allow you to even attach her lead rope.' This is normal. The young horse has been left now, with no training for over 4 months, with one horse. Of course she will try to stay with that horse. 100% normal.

    When a young horse is with its mother, or with a buddy it's bonded to after being with that horse constantly for months, and has no training for months, it is normal for it to be difficult to handle, to not know where to go ('trampling me') and to be afraid of equipment('won't allow me to even attach her lead rope') and to 'run from me.' This is normal, it is what she fundamentally has been 'trained to do' as she has not been trained to do anything else.

    Ideally, young horses are handled briefly, daily. Because they are young these sessions have to be very very simple and VERY BRIEF. Some people go on and on for hours with a youngster, and very often they only work with that baby once a month or less. And that just does not produce good results. The key is a little bit often.

    So, for example, my youngster. With my youngster, I'd spend a few MINUTES - but every day, leading him from one stall to another, picking up his feet, grooming, all for just a few minutes at a time. No long sessions. They do not really need to be drilled over and over and over and their attention span at that age is very, very short. They do not need hours of repetition and hours of training just mixes them up and stresses them out.

    No idea what training she got before you, but being left 'to be a baby' means she's pretty much a feral horse at this point. And she needs her feet done, her teeth checked, she needs vaccinations, and she needs worming. So she needs to start learning to be handled, led, etc.

    Suggestion: have a decent professional trainer who does a lot of halter breaking and handling of young horses, show you how to work with your horse. It's never going to work to try to catch her and work with her in an indoor arena or paddock. She needs to be in a stall. She can learn to just turn and follow you around in the stall, by intelligent use of the lead rope. It's impossible to explain this to you online - you need to have someone who is right there with you, show you this.

     
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  6. Legacy08

    Legacy08 Registered

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    I bought her because I had 2 people to train her and teach me how to train and work with her
    Unfortunately one is too busy with her horse and the other is busy with her farm
    This is something I want to achieve, something i know i can learn. I dont want.to give up on legacy. I work with her daily with her lead rope and to me that a good start.
     
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  7. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    If they are busy, find a real professional to that will help you in exchange for money. Friends are great but they aren't going to give you the time of day or real instruction as often as you need it.
     
  8. Legacy08

    Legacy08 Registered

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    I do completely agree with you about me not having any experience. But I am learning and it is.something I want to learn. As for the owner of the farm I can't say what experience she has.
     
  9. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    I start and train babies at the barn where I work. They are handled, haltered, led, clipped, hooves picked and trimmed, wear some tack like bareback pads, introduced to walking over stuff like ground poles and tarps, walked and trotted in patterns to learn walk/ trot/whoa. Lunged extremely carefully in one or two circles each way (this is sparingly and not centering when little), ponies in short spurts, tied, yield hind and fore, back up, etc. The key is short 10-15 sessions a few days a week. We don't drill them, but if one does this and then ground work later, they're broke before you ever throw a leg over.
    I do not recommend a baby as a first horse. You need someone to help you because if she's running you over now it will only escalate as she gets bigger. This is a disaster waiting to happen and a horse can kill you even with championship bloodlines. Please pay someone to give you handling and horsemanship lessons. No way do you have the skill set to embark on the list I just gave you alone. Good luck.
     
  10. ~tiffy~

    ~tiffy~ Senior Member

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    I like your enthusiasm @Legacy08 but I do hope you get someone to help you. Your filly is at a critical age. She’s absorbing everything like a sponge.
    The good AND bad.
    I bought a green broke 3 year old many years ago. I wanted to learn and do all the steps with guidance. The horse won. I had no idea what I was doing and I wasn’t doing him any favors. Ended up giving him to someone with more experience so that he could flourish. It’s not about us and what we want to do, it’s about the future we can give these horses. Pleas get guidance.
     

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