Tips to get the lazy cob fit!?

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by NathanAndrews, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. NathanAndrews

    NathanAndrews Full Member

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    My five year old has just been gelded yesterday (Finally the bloody second ball dropped!!) and I’ve had him for about, a year, and he’s been in full time work, rode five times a week, 30 mins each time. We normally do lots of transitions, circles, serpentines, random on and off the track to get him use to moving away from my leg. And he’s still not bloody fit! And it’s driving me insane!

    He now needs either lungeing or riding 10 mins a day, three times a day. And I’m leaning towards lungeing him honestly rather than riding.

    So, he can’t go past the trot. What can I do to get his fitness up?
     
  2. brl_rcr72

    brl_rcr72 Full Member

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    I advise against lunging a horse for conditioning purposes especially if he has been riding consistently for year - it will bore him to death and is hard on their legs if overdone. It's a good skill to have and practice occasionally but not for conditioning.
    I would take him long trotting at a nice good stretched out trot and build up the amount of time you do it for. you can do this outside the arena too, and climb hills, weave around trees etc.
    Remember tho, he is a cob so he will always be chunkier and never will look like a racy TB or little Arabian.
    Good luck!
     
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  3. NathanAndrews

    NathanAndrews Full Member

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    He’s been out of ridden work for about two months due to hind leg problems! And with his being gelded yesterday. I don’t fancy riding him till his 90% healed!
     
  4. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Wait four weeks until he heals. Go out trail riding for long lazy rides. Lunging is very hard on the joints, not to mention boring for the horse and there's no weight to carry to help shave off pounds.

    Stay out for lengthy periods. Start with an hour and increase the time and work slowly so that he will eventually be capable of long trotting for a couple miles without breaking much sweat. More time moving, less time standing around snd eating will do it.
     
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  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Oh....boy.

    What in the WORLD makes you think he won't canter because he's not fit enough????

    I will bet you five hundred dollars that is NOT why he won't canter.

    And why would he need longeing or riding for 10 minutes, 3 times a day?

    Does he sweat up that bad? Then he needs to be clipped and possibly even seen by a vet.

    And why do you want to longe instead of ride?

    I really need to apologize in advance for saying this as I know where it will go, LOL, but none of what you have written makes any sense.....again, sorry.

    Number one. He's a cob. They almost NEVER canter easily. They aren't built for it. They're built to trot. They have long backs and especially when young it's very difficult to get and maintain a canter.

    You have to get them very, very balanced and very, very straight and sharp off your leg and they've got to be forward but packaged together, not sprawled out, or they just cannot canter. You have to sit very upright, not lean forward, not throw the rein at them....it's not easy to get them to canter.

    MOST people 'run' a horse into a canter. They get horse to trot really fast, pull on the outside rein, kick a lot, and finally the horse does a shuffly sort of canter...maybe. That doesn't work with this type of horse at all. They just get more off balance ('trot faster and faster') or get mad and start getting nappy (stopping) because they're hitting themselves (toe of hind hooves hitting heel of front hooves).

    If a horse really is going to work as much as you say, he' plenty fit to be working on canter, but no matter HOW fit he is, if he's not sharp off your leg and balanced and straight and packed together, he CAN'T canter, not won't can't. Literally, physically can't. Longeing may help, but not if it's all trotting, or just that he will listen to the longe whip but not your leg.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    "hind leg problems?" What kind of hind leg problems? Do you think he maybe is not cantering because of that?

    A horse takes only a few days to heal from gelding unless there is some serious complication, and there usually isn't.
     
  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I would not stay out for lengthy periods, not for many months yet. First thing I would do is find out about these 'hind leg problems' and make REALLY sure he should be working at all right now.

    But once he was cleared for work, sure I'd start with riding, ten minutes, not longeing, and obviously he'd be walking under saddle til he was rehabbed - maybe a month or so. But when I put my leg on by Great Cesar's Ghost he would WALK - promptly. Like his tail was on fire, starting up like he was jumping right out of his skin - THAT prompty. And NOT with throwing the reins at his head or leaning forward. Keep the contact (you'll need it to package him up to canter later), move your hands forward only one inch when asking him to start walking, and then follow the motions of his head like it's your religion, letting your hands always keep a contact with the mouth always, but follow his head and neck motions at walk.

    Stallions can get absolutely iron-sided and you have to get them to the point where they react to the 'wind of your boot.' There's no other way. Don't let the horse do any less than that. His tackle may be cut off but he may be hard-sided for months yet - or forever, if you allow that.

    Besides, the ONLY way he'll ever canter is if you start out with walk work on a contact, that makes him push off with each hind leg very strongly and promptly. You can't just slob along at the walk with the reins hanging down if you want him to canter some day. There is that one little second when you start the walk, where he goes 'Man, she means business' that he pushes with ONE hind leg. Then you go the other way and do it again. So each hind leg has a second of making that push. That is what gets him strong again and enables him to pick up the canter properly. And then later on, maintain a canter.

    I would not ride this horse for longer than ten minutes to start back to work after rehab, but he'd be going like hail in the night during that 10 minutes. And he would pick up the canter, ONCE in each direction, and hold it for a quarter of a way around a circle (oh yes canter on a BIG CIRCLE, not a straight line), and then I'd get off and take him to the barn and feed him.

    One SECOND of good, ONE real reaction to a leg aid when properly put together, is better training than hours of not quite so horrible but not getting at the central problem. And all long trotting will do is teach him NOT to canter! They're plenty trotty enough already, these cobs.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  8. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Naht~!!
    Don't go around telling people horses take a few days to heal from gelding. Week off.
    How abouts we make an incision on both sides of YOUR crotch and put you to work a couple days later, all with an open incision for drainage?
     
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  9. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    I think you really need some help. Horses are not like dogs, and you seem (sometimes) to lack very basic knowledge concerning their handling and well being. Please, before something happens either to you or the horse, get someone to help you.
     
  10. NathanAndrews

    NathanAndrews Full Member

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    He had to be stitched up. So the healing time is four to six weeks. There is a lot more complications due to him being a five year old, fully matured stallion. I ride him, he’ll get excited a buck - stiches are gone. Same with lungeing honestly. I have to be extremely careful to keep the wound stitched up!

    Walking three times a day for ten minutes is for drainage of the blood. There is a tiny, tiny hole they let for blood to drain out of. Walking helps the blood drain. Thus making the healing more comfortable for the pony.

    Hind leg problems - he had a twisted pelvis. But he’s all fixed now. And good to go.

    He can canter perfectly fine on one rein, he can pick it up, and carry himself nicely. The other rein, not so much. His front leg canters. Back legs sorta “hop”. It’s different to say the least.
     
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