Tips on stopping biting, please?:)

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by John Carpenter, Dec 28, 2016.

  1. horseingreyflannelsuit

    horseingreyflannelsuit Senior Member

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    I don't disagree with those who are suggesting getting help from a professional to show the opster how to deal with this situation, but I do think it would be a bit more helpful here, if the opster would expound on the first post to clarify a few things. For example, when is this horse chasing you? Is it only during feeding time or if there is food already in front of it? Does it occur any time you enter stall / corral / paddock / pasture?

    Horses and handlers both very in knowledge and experience and it is hard to know exactly which method to utilize without seeing the opster and said horse interact in person. Not all aggression is fear related. Some animals can and do learn that they can walk all over their owners, simply because the owners either unwittingly allowed the horse to take the lead or through training with the intention of the animal learning a bad habit and in this situation a dangerous one. If the owner / handler isn't in charge, the horse is.
     
  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Yup. It's not your horse, not your problem. Stay out of it and let a pro handle it.
     
  3. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    See, this is why you don't mess with horses who are not BEGINNER horses when you aren't knowledgable enough to do so. You effectively just REINFORCED the horse's aggression towards people. You are effectively making him WORSE.

    I just don't get the thinking behind : Lemme go "hang out" with this horse. He doesn't want you or anyone else ''hanging out''. He wants, food, comfort and safety. You are not safe. That's why he's charging and biting. People who didn't know what they are doing MADE this horse like this, (unless he has a brain tumor, which is EXTREMELY rare) and the more the inexperienced fool around with him, the more aggressive he will get until he grabs someone by the throat, throws him down and stomps him to death.

    If you would like that to be you? keep going in the field with him. I've watch a horse grab someone by the throat, right before my eyes, pick him up, throw him down and commence to stomp on him. I intervened and took the horse. He respected me, but not the dummass that was fooling with him.

    Stop getting involved with Rescue horses; that is only for Horsemen. This is the problem with horse LOVERS who haven't experience, but dang it~!! They're gonna "SAVE" some horses. You can't rescue something when you have no knowledge of how to do it. If you are only there to fool with rescues? rescues like this one? I hope you have your will made out.
     
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  4. horseingreyflannelsuit

    horseingreyflannelsuit Senior Member

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    I didn't see that the opster had replied before I did. Anyway, just a comment on the hanging out thing. There are people with the impression that a horse is just like a dog, only bigger and since the behavior of dogs is cool and desired, they like the idea of their horse being that way too. Horses are not "big" dogs, do not think like a dog and should not be treated or handled like one. I shudder when I see people trying to get their horse to behave like a dog. It is a recipe for injuries and accidents waiting to happen. This said horse needs to have a very experienced "horseman" to do what needs to be done on or around it. This horse is too much for the opster.
     
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  5. John Carpenter

    John Carpenter Full Member

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    I agree that I shouldn't handle this horse. I was really looking for something I could do from outside the fence. But what I'm really worried about some kid or adult who doesn't know him and getting bitten.
    He comes over to the fence or stall gate and acts like he really wants to see you and then starts biting.
    What I think is strange is that he doesn't really bite in his stall.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    This is normal. Most horses do this in exactly the way you describe. It's not strange at all.

    Most biting is playfulness(horses play rough - the average slightly playful horse can make a floor pizza out of a human in a few seconds) or a mild form of territorial behavior.

    Wading into a herd in a confined area like a paddock or lane, even in a larger area - that just is not for the novice. Horses charge each other in those situations and a novice just is not going to know how to react and protect himself.

    LOL....my old riding instructor would walk out to the gate, open it wide, point to one horse and say, frisky come here. Frisky would come through the gate and stand there to be haltered. The others would stand as quiet as church mice and not try to go through the gate or even pin an ear at each other. She'd shut the gate. She could walk out in the pasture and all the horses would clear a path for her to walk. With most people, it doesn't go like that.

    And as a general rule, the horses that don't bite are the horses that were firmly, patiently and skillfully trained not to bite.

    Biting comes very naturally to horses and is a normal part of their herd behavior. Horses in herds are constantly threatening to bite each other, biting in play, biting on toys or fences, in order to entertain themselves when bored, or biting themselves if they have an itch.

    It's a normal behavior that is removed by training in other words.

    Unless someone teaches the horse to bite - such as by feeding it treats, so it's frantically looking for treats and biting at the person's hands in an effort to get that treat, by running away when the horse does bite at them(the correction of that little habit best left to a professional), and so on.

    I was working away the other day and felt a pair of TEETH clip at my back, LOL. Evidently one of the horses dribbled feed all over my back, and it was proving just a wee bit too tantalizing to another horse.

    LOL. Yes, the horse was punished. But it's the kind of thing that happens.

    Horses are like sharks. They are eating machines. They want to eat all the time. The human wandering toward them is a treat dispenser, all they have to do is turn the human upside down and give him a good shake, and the treats will fall out of those ....pocketses.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  7. horseingreyflannelsuit

    horseingreyflannelsuit Senior Member

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    Beware of the shark horse. :willynilly:

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. equicrzy

    equicrzy Senior Member

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    That's just..........creepy!
     
  9. Quarter Girl

    Quarter Girl Senior Member

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    Is it a him being goofy bite or a him being aggressive bite. If he is just a goof with no manners try to catch it before bites by putting your hand on his nose (the lovely squishy part) and rub not a soft little massage rub but a getting your dog all worked up kind of rub, rub up and down the bridge of his nose so he learns head stays in one place, last one is teach him to turn on his hindquarters by pressing nose and shoulder with whip (don't whip horse just hold both ends there) if he does bite DO NOT SLAP HIM IN THE NOSE!! A flick on the cheek or slap in the neck or chest gets the point across and doesn't create a nose shyness.
    If he's aggressively biting you I would 1) figure out what in his background caused it 2) if he looks like he's about to bite say "NOOO!" in a really low voice, if he bites a slap with a whip and a bit of a chase till he submits and wants to come back to you. Hearing he's chasing YOU in the pasture and biting, I would be going to the round pen and interacting and as soon as he bites do some tough love round pen sessions
     
  10. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    Bringing this post back up. Not your Monkees, not your circus and responsibility lies with the owners. Best advice seriously is to stay clear. I know we seem blunt, but we've been through things like this and you stand clear. Always.
     
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