Tie up stalls....

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by ronnierio, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. ronnierio

    ronnierio Full Member

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    Im having some tie up stalls built in my field to keep my 4 horses in at night and when weather is awful. They have all lived in loose boxes but not stalls. Any advice on how to safely get them used to being restricted? I plan on using a bobbin to tie them on. :D
     
  2. HappyHoof

    HappyHoof Senior Member

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    I'm not sure what you're describing? Instead of tie stalls, why not regular stalls?
     
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  3. harli36

    harli36 Senior Member

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    She's describing a standing stall. They work great for short periods of time, such as overnights. They save space and use less bedding. Plus horses are standing closer to one another and the last research I read on them they reduce stress behaviors.

    OP my mare used to be kept in a standing stall. As long as the horses tie well you probably don't really have to do any training. My only concern would be a horse who severely dislikes being trailered but even then you would probably be ok. Just gauge your horses reaction and go from there.
     
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  4. HappyHoof

    HappyHoof Senior Member

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    Ah, okay, I had no idea. Sort of like picketing overnight while camping?
     
  5. CoffeeBean

    CoffeeBean Senior Member

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    I love standing stalls! They're perfect for miserable weather to bring the outside horses in and ENSURE everyone has a dry, warm, SOLO place to go.

    Planning helps - are you going to have best buddies next to one another or separated? Make certain that there is a barrier so that a horse can eat, see friends but NOT "help their neighbour" with dinner or anything else. Horses that are used to being in a trailer will probably take to it pretty readily. Personally, I prefer a solid bar that requires no latching as a butt bar for a standing stall if you have a horse that likes to back up to test its limits. (Here's a photo of a horse trailer butt bar that is pretty easily made for a stall: http://www.traveledlanetrailers.com/bockmann/images/Portax A bt bar & angled mount P7260331.jpg) Some horses do beautifully with a regular stall guard (1" diameter strong rubber coated center with chains exposed on each end. Total length of stall/trailer guard is 42 1/2").

    With a small-mesh hay bag secured to the front to focus their attention, water, friends and some personal space most horses are just fine for an hour, a night or even a day or two (if the weather is REALLY bad). Plus it's pretty darn easy to clean which is a real blessing if you have a horse, or horses, who LIVE to play "buried treasure" or worse!

    http://www.morandindustries.com/horse-stalls.html
    http://www.silverstarstables.com/newboarding.html
    http://haycreekranch.net/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=319
    http://www.cbarj.com/HorseFacilities.html (scroll to bottom)
     
  6. sparkzwb

    sparkzwb Senior Member

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    I don't really understand these so I don't want to say anything bad about them.

    I would prefer a lean-to personally, or a full sized stall where the horse has the ability to move around. I can't imagine penning a horse in one of these for days.

    If they are in a pasture a three sided shed or anything of the sort would be enough to keep them out of the weather. Assuming it was sized correctly for the number of horses.
     
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  7. CoffeeBean

    CoffeeBean Senior Member

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    I've seen one horse keep all other horses out of a 20' x 20' run-in shed just because the boss could and wished to do so - which really stinks when it's one of those cold raw wet days.

    If a horse is given ample exercise (or turn out), then they can be used daily. If they are 4'6" - 6' wide, solid to the ground, then a horse can lay down if they wish. It does minimize hay waste if you have a horse who likes to pick at their hay & turn it into bedding when bored in a stall.

    http://www.equisearch.com/trail_riding/international-travel/eqroyalmew1134/

    Standing (or tie) stalls are still used for the Queen's horses in London.

    They were used for a long, long time and they're not necessarily bad. Husbandry is what matters the most. I've seen box stalls that rivaled the Aegean stables if they weren't regularly cleaned. Heck, I've seen what some horses will do in one night in their box stall just because they hate being stalled and/or they're slobs.

    Response by Wander at 2008-02-26 12:07:43
    I just had a new barn built and up here they made each of the tie stalls 6 ft wide and 11 ft long. One can normally see tie stalls 5-6 ft wide by 9 ft long. The reason mine are so long is we wanted a walk way in the front of the stalls so that if we had someone feeding for us then they had no reason to go in with the horses as all they would have to do was drop hay or grain in front of each horse. We had 6 tie stalls made and 5 box stalls as we had the room. That being said we did not put in the partitions for 3 of the box stalls but we do have them. We used SoftStalls in all of the stalls. We even have the SoftStalls for the 3 box stalls that we did not erect as we got a good deal on them. The horses can still lie down in the tie stalls. We use a tie system that has a large ball on the end of the tie so that the horses can not get hung up on the leads. The horses do not go in except for feeding and they all go in the tie stall for that. If the horses have to be kept in because of weather then the older horses get the box stalls and the younger horses get the tie stalls. If we have a sick horse it goes in the box stall. When you are building a barn make sure you have at least one box stall for that very reason. My box stalls were suppose to be 12ft by 10ft but somehow they ended up being 12ft by 12 ft and I really do not need them that big. A foaling stall needs to be bigger but I do not know the measurements as most people here just make sure to put in 2 box stalls with a removable partition so that they then have a large stall. My best advice to you would be to sit down and decide what you really want to use the barn for and make a list of what you really would like in this barn. If at all possible make the barn so that you can add your desires as you can afford them. In my case, I would love to have a stable cleaning system but I knew I could not afford it so I made sure that my barn was built so that when I can afford it (or win a lottery, fat chance) I could add it. The two things that I have in my barn that I really, really like are running water and a hot water heater that I can turn off and on. The gentleman that did them for me made sure that the water (with a grate drain) could all be drained so that the pipes do not freeze - I just turn two handles and it works great!!! I did a lot of research before I built so that I have a very workable barn and also something that would add value if I had to sell at any time. Have fun with your new building and even though it may be frustrating at times in the end it will be worth it so enjoy the ride.......

    Wander
    Response by Tegie Endsley at 2008-02-26 12:12:58
    Maurice Telleen in "The Draft Horse Pimer" give the dimension of a single tie stall as five feet wide. He says the hose takes up seven feet of lentgh. A double stall is 8 feet wide with some using 9 feet for really big horses. The double tie stall might be nice for folks who reallr work their horse a lot bring them to the barn for lunch and then go back out to the field. That was they can just unhook and drive them to the stall. After lunch they can hook back up without re harnessing.
    Response by Virginia Gal at 2008-02-26 12:33:06
    I used to use tie stalls under the same conditions as you describe and always left the lead rope long enough so they could lay down. I kept shavings on the floor and they would get down for a period of time during the night. Never had a problem with the long lead rope although you know how horses can be....they stayed in overnight at certain times of severe weather but got plenty of exercise during the day. It's not good for their circulation to be tied. If your horses have a problem with stocking up, for instance, tying would make it worse. But, if you're building a new barn, and planning to keep them in overnight, you might consider building boxes for that and rig up an easily moved divider down the middle for tie stalls when you need them. The yearling should have a box regardless, in my opinion.
    Response by Jay Moyer at 2008-02-26 13:18:13
    Do your horses sleep standing up most of the time? Overnight is no issue in a tie stall. Turn them out in the morning for some exercise and if the weather is bad let them back in if they chose it, not if you think they need it. The chains used to tie them should be long enough that they can lie down but not long enough that they can stretch out(mine hang to about 4 inches above the ground). I have never had a horse lie down in the tie stall however.
     
  8. HappyHoof

    HappyHoof Senior Member

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    Oh, wow! Now you've got me thinking this isn't such a bad idea! I live in NC and our horses are on 24/7 turn out with two run in stalls. However, the mares fight over the shelter and leave the boys in the cold. Since NC only rarely gets cold+wet at the same time, it's usually not a problem... But now I'm wondering if I can convert the two run in stalls into three tie stalls. :D
     
  9. XxLiveToRidexX

    XxLiveToRidexX Senior Member

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    Personally, if I had the choice, I would still go with box stalls. While they may be convenient, I don't think they are by any means comfortable.

    The ones I have seen are about horse trailer length and room size with a manger in the front. So the horse can shuffle but can't truly move, they also can't lay down if they choose.

    This would certainly cause my horse more stress then a box stall.
     
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  10. CoffeeBean

    CoffeeBean Senior Member

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    That's the beauty of it - there's no perfect solution for every horse, owner or property. Mix & match.

    I need to correct myself - that run-in shed that was monopolized was 20' deep and 40' wide. Still too small to be shared with others, evidently :rolleyes:

    Another thought is to have side-by-side tie stalls with removable partitions that could be transformed into a box stall as needed. It's not uncommon to have a foaling stall set up in exactly that manner when foaling season is ended.
     

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