Ticks, Repellent, and Lyme?!

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by CautionWetPaint, May 18, 2018.

  1. CautionWetPaint

    CautionWetPaint Senior Member

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    The warm weather is here, and so are the ticks...GROSS!!! I have never had a tick problem with my horses before, but just last night I had to pull a tick off of my horses neck. What all do you guys use for a tick repellent for your horses? Is there a monthly application you can give (kind of like dogs and cats)? Or even a daily application? When the weather is nice, my horses stay out 24/7 on grass and have trees on the outside of the fence, so perfect housing for the little boogers to hide and attach to my horses.

    Now the reason I put Lyme in the title is, what are the symptoms of Lyme in a horse? Also how long does it take for symptoms to show if the horse did get it? I know I might sound like a really overprotective owner, but I'd like to be prepared since I have heard this is supposed to be the worst tick season we have seen yet.
     
  2. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    It's a terrible tick season! They're worse than I've ever seen them. I hate the beastly things!

    I use Endure spray, which works better than any commercial spray I've tried before. I only apply it once every 4 or 5 days because it lasts, and so far the ticks have stayed off my horses. You can also use Permectrin spray (you need to dilute it) but I don't really like to unless I have to. It's very strong.

    Also, long grass or weeds tend to be tick-ridden so if you can mow your pasture it helps. I don't know about Lyme symptoms - thankfully I've never experienced it.
     
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  3. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    As far as repellant goes--I use essential oils and smartpak makes a nice fly spray that repels ticks as well. But you have to apply it very few hours. Maintaining your pasture is also key. The topical ointments don't work. Don't waste your money.

    As far as lyme goes, I fell like I'm an expert at this case. The minute your horse is off and has a fever or is lame off and on, suspect lyme. There are other tick borne illnesses that cause fever as well so be watchful of your horse's body temp. Lyme presents oddly sometimes. Especially if it's chronic. I just finished treating a mare who had chronic lyme with minocycline. She had a lot of neuro issues as well as lameness and stiffness and just odd behavior.

    Check your horse daily for ticks. Guinea Fowl are good to keep around if you can--they eat ticks!
     
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  4. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    Yup. And you have to really dig. They like to burrow into hiding places. The crest of the mane is one, and the base of the tail. My horses both have thick tails so I have to painstakingly part the hair all down the dock piece by piece to suss out the little boogers.

    Armpits are also good places and under the chin - they like it there and I've had them cause a nasty abscess under there when I missed one. Also the boy parts.

    I go over my kids inch by inch with my hands and have gotten so I can recognize the odd tiny bump that marks a tick. Beastly things! I feel creepy crawly all day after I find one.
     
  5. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    A few days ago I pulled a tick off the skin right in the edge of the anal area. I don't have fingernails so I smothered the tick in the first ointment my hands came to on the counter.

    I went about my barn chores and 15-20 minutes later, I was able to easily remove the tick with a piece of paper towel.

    We don't have the tick issues we used to have but we have lived here 14+ years and keep the property well mowed and bushogged.

    Plus I check the horses twice daily (with a flashlight in the dark areas).

    I have even pulled ticks off the inside of one of the geldings sheath. Ticks are nasty little b******s:(

    MTG is sulphur based and ticks do not seem to like the smell. I have fairly good luck soaking the bottom of their tails and the bottoms of their legs --- just be sure your horse won't have an a,Lerwick reaction to the MTG.
     
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  6. CautionWetPaint

    CautionWetPaint Senior Member

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    Well I think I'm stocking up on Endure and MTG! Haha! My horse has a thin mane and tail so good reason to work on growing them out lol
    I will definitely start checking daily. Have never had this problem before, so this will be a not-so-fun new adventure. Any tips for finding ticks on a black horse? My paint will be easy to spot but my quarter is solid black...
     
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  7. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    We have chickens, and they really have helped with the ticks.

    Here in MN. The ticks are always bad. The problem is most of the ticks that carry lymes are SO tiny, they are almost impossible to find until they are quite "full" (full, they are about average tick size).

    From vets around here, I have heard Ultra Boss pour on works pretty well. Just ordered some.
     
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  8. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    By feel. I know, kinda gross as I hate ticks, but you get used to using your fingers and can spot them quickly once you get used to it.
     
  9. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    And don't forget the girl parts too. Removed one today from a nipple, and one a few days ago from the outside fold of a vulva. That was one very thankful mare from the itching it caused. I rarely find ticks anywhere but the belly and inner hind legs. Strange how ticks from different regions migrate to different body parts.
     
  10. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    We primarily have Lone Star ticks and Deer ticks.

    The Lone Star ticks carry Lymes, and also Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever which humans do contract but horses don't seem to.

    With the Lone Star ticks, even if they are still looking for a place to dig in, they look like a tiny shiny piece of dirt --- when they are newly settled into the horse's skin they can flatten themselves under the hair to where they are near impossible to find; if they are on a hairless area their shine quickly gives them away.

    Also, I keep the sweat showered off my horses every night, which I think might help. When I do shampoo them I don't use anything "fruity". I use any kind of horse shampoo with betadyine in it, which a,so seems to help a little in keeping the ticks off the horse "for five more minutes" :)
     

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