Thoughts on the quality of this feed?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by ClassicSolo, Oct 1, 2017.

  1. ClassicSolo

    ClassicSolo Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    62
    Just curious what those of you with nutritional knowledge think of the quality of this complete feed? Thanks! IMG_20171001_184154.jpg
     
  2. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    17,381
    Likes Received:
    20,692
    Being the third ingredient is molasses, it isn't something I would feed
     
    ClassicSolo likes this.
  3. ClassicSolo

    ClassicSolo Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2013
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    62
    My thoughts, too. Thanks!
     
  4. PyroTekNik333

    PyroTekNik333 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    7,405
    Likes Received:
    11,568
    I would love to see the nsc on it before I pass judgement.
    If the ingredients are listed in order of weight like usual the molasses is only before the vitamin/mineral mix which wouldn't weigh much at all.
    So it could have very little molasses and if so it looks like a good feed for an easy keeper.
    Named ingredients and all forage are big plusses.
    Or it could have a whack ton of molasses and be awful!
     
  5. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    19,830
    Likes Received:
    11,997
    Since the 4th ingredient is Phosphoric Acid, which would not be in the feed in great amount, and especially since feed manufacturers are not required by law to list the ingredients in order by amount (weight), I would not jump to conclusions about how much molasses was in there, until I actually found out how much molasses was in the feed.

    Also, I would guess that the first two ingredients (hay) would need some molasses just to process the first two ingredients.

    Some companies would replace some(up to half) of the molasses with oil so they can tout the food as 'low sugar' and the NSC will show lower. Supposedly that is better because 'fat is better than sugar.' However, fat causes almost as big an insulin spike as sugar, it just occurs a little later than the spike caused by sugar.

    However, with this feed, the question becomes, why not feed hay and a vitamin-mineral supplement if molasses is such a huge concern? The main ingredients being ground/pressed into a pellet or fed chopped doesn't really do that much for the horse as far as digestion goes. It might help horses with dental problems a little.

    For myself I prefer, if I have to feed a complete feed for some really compelling reason, which generally would be a really serious medical problem, to feed one based on beet pulp, which is more easily digested than hay.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    19,830
    Likes Received:
    11,997
    A lot also depends on the reason the feed was selected, too. To refeed a starved animal? I would not be so concerned about NSC. An occasional substitute when hay or pasture is not available(such as when traveling)? Again, not so concerned. An alternative to an even higher NSC feed? Again, same.

    Also, the concerns about NSC seem to have gone more than a little crazy. If a nutritionist veterinarian says an NSC below 20 is healthy for a horse with a mild metabolic problem, there may be little to be gained by insisting the NSC now must be below 10. If same individual says an NSC over 20 is safe for a non-metabolic horse, again, no need to insist on feeding him a feed that's below 10.

    It's also important to look at the NSC of the overall diet, not just the bagged feed. The amount is also important. A horse that receives a pound of a 'higher NSC feed' may not really be in danger if the other 19 lbs of his diet is low in NSC. Further, a horse that receives an excess of pasture and hay is not really going to be 'fixed' by reducing the NSC of the bagged feed he gets, he may be getting 90 or 95% of his calories from his pasture and hay. Commonsense, as always.

    The overall diet matters, but it's also very rare that a person gets their hay or pasture analyzed. So quite often, the problem area isn't really known.

    And....Sometimes the real problem area of the diet is the pasture and that needs to be restricted by reducing the number of hours a day a horse is grazing.

    Bottom line - if that feed is mostly hay with a small amount of molasses, it's not a big deal for many many situations.
     
  7. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    15,746
    Likes Received:
    7,440
    I would 100% be worried about NSC content of a feed when feeding a starved animal. They probably have ulcers due to having an empty stomach for a prolonged period of time. High forage diet and low NSC feed would be very important to me in that case.

    I refuse to feed anything over 15% NSC anyways so I am always watching.
     
    Sam C. and Ms_Pigeon like this.
  8. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    15,469
    Likes Received:
    13,245
    I don't think it sounds too bad :unsure: Molasses is mostly used as a binder.

    I would want to know the NSC, but my educated guess is that it isn't too bad, since alfalfa is the first ingredient. I don't bermuda grass tends to run high NSC either.

    What's the feeding rate? Is it a hay replacer or stretcher? It sounds like one.
     
    PyroTekNik333 likes this.
  9. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2009
    Messages:
    1,743
    Likes Received:
    1,853
    It doesn't look too bad but that doesn't mean I would feed it as one of my horses is insulin resistant, therefore the other horse (an easy keeper) can just eat the same base diet.

    What I do see that I like is no added iron. I looked at the label three times and I don't see iron listed anywhere, which is a good thing.

    Also in its favor, the protein source is alfalfa instead of soy or soy by-products.

    OP ---- is the food Pelletized or loose feed like sweet feed would be? If it's Pelletized then the molasses part wouldn't be too bad for a healthy horse but not something IR, EMS, PSSM, and horses with other similar diseases could have. It also depends on how many pounds it takes to meet the requirement listed on the bag --- that is generally one pound.

    Circle C, 15% is a high amount of NSC value for any sort of supplement, bagged feed, or ration balancer. By the time the horse's hay and pasture are factored in, that 15% would have a horse's hooves pointing skyward, if it was leaning toward or had metabolic issues,

    I feed a condensed Vit/min supplement that only requires three ounces daily and has a guaranteed maximum NSC value of 4.25%
     
  10. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    15,746
    Likes Received:
    7,440
    10/15% NSC is not high for a feed. Not at all.
     

Share This Page