Thoroughbred; Still Growing?

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by DiamondRio, Sep 25, 2008.

  1. DiamondRio

    DiamondRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Messages:
    3,671
    Likes Received:
    226
    Does anyone know when thoroughbreds stop growing on average?

    I have a just turned 5 thoroughbred that had some leg pain and the vet told me she thinks she was just having growing pains and was wondering when I can expect her to stop growing?

    I have had her since March and definitely think she has gotten a little taller but have not measured her since i first got her. (she was 15.3h)
     






  2. Berlunz

    Berlunz Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    Messages:
    4,420
    Likes Received:
    2,399
    a lot of it depends on blood lines as well as breed, its something insanely hard to determine. But usually most TB's stop growing (not maturing, just growing) at a very young age. But its really impossible to tell unless someone knows the bloodlines etc. For instance our babies are usually their final height by 2 or 3 years old where as my instructors continue to grow until 7 or so
     
  3. DiamondRio

    DiamondRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Messages:
    3,671
    Likes Received:
    226
    That is interesting. I do know her bloodlines but dont know anything about them at all.

    People keep telling me that she is definitely still growing but I dont really know anything about tb growth patterns I really only know about warmbloods because we have more of them. :)

    Thank you.
     
  4. MissyMelC

    MissyMelC Full Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    2
    It would also depend on if the horses knees were still open aka growth plates were still open. I know they can't (well, shouldn't) race with open growth plates, so I suspect if this is the case hard work isn't a good idea either! Not sure what you're doing with your horse, (I'm guessing not racing) but it might be a good idea to get those checked.

    Some horses are just slow to mature...
     
  5. Dawn

    Dawn Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    45,411
    Likes Received:
    2,685
    I think it would be incredibly unusual for a 5 year old of any breed to have a large and abrupt enough growth spurt to cause a growing pain (which is actually pain caused by tension on the tendons/ligaments and can cause damage if not handled properly). But given her malnourished background, imo, that would make her more likely to have more growth now than a typical five year old.

    As far as when they stop growing, same as any other breed. By 5 years old, they've all but stopped growing 'up', but are still growing 'out' for about another year or so.
     
  6. DiamondRio

    DiamondRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Messages:
    3,671
    Likes Received:
    226
    I have had her since march and before I bought her she raced 18 months before and then sat in a field until I got her.
    The vet did look at her and just said to keep doing what we were doing (light work) until she was completely sound (which she is now) and then continue with regular work which for now is hacking and schooling small jumps.

    Dawn; That is a good assumption and would have never thought that could effect how she is growing now. She was probably around 3 when she was taken off the track and sold to the lady that starved her.

    She definitely is still growing out and maybe a little too far haha.
     
  7. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Messages:
    65,636
    Likes Received:
    29,953
    At age 5, nothing in the front legs is still growing. Growth plates in the hocks are a possibility though.

    But no, "leg pain" should NOT be dismissed as "growing pains" :rolleyes:

    It is possible she has grown up since you got her, as there are more than a few TBs who have grown in height in their 6 and even 7yo year. What will happen though moreso is a filling out - widening chest a bit, widening rib cage a bit, and more muscle development now that energy isn't being put into bone growth.
     
  8. DiamondRio

    DiamondRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Messages:
    3,671
    Likes Received:
    226
    Well the pain was in her left hind and the vet said that it was probably a combination of growing pains and the rapid gain of weight she had while I was away and she was not in work. She probably gained about 80lbs while I was away for two weeks.

    She was only off for about a week and is now completely sound and the vet has okayed her for regular work I was just wondering on average how long it takes them to finish off growing. :)
     
  9. luckydragon

    luckydragon Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2007
    Messages:
    3,833
    Likes Received:
    1,173
    It really does just depend. One of my geldings was still growing at 7, and his brother is 5 and getting a little taller. But my Mom's gelding was pretty much done at 4, he just filled out some. But like JB said, she shouldn't be having leg pains from growing...:rolleyez:
     
  10. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Messages:
    65,636
    Likes Received:
    29,953
    Where in the LH? I highly, highly doubt it was growth-related or weight-related. She may have had a small abcess, may have tweaked her ankle a bit, or hock, who knows. As long as she's sound now, that's important, but don't forget she was lame for a bit.
     






Share This Page