This friggin horse

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Misty H, Aug 11, 2018.

  1. Misty H

    Misty H Full Member

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    so Souvie has not been choking this past week, what Souvie has been doing is coughing because of the DUST of the hay!! He is having allergies to the dust which is causing him to cough! Of all things, he can eat from a sandy yard no problems but pulls hay and gets bail dust he coughs lol :cautious::crazy: this horse is going to make me go mental yet. Vet gave him a clear just said to spray the hay down to help with the dust given he REFUSES to eat wet hay!!
     
  2. CarlisleChipper

    CarlisleChipper Senior Member+

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    It's probably not just dust then but mold.
     
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  3. lhoward

    lhoward Senior Member

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    With the history of repeated and sometimes severe choke, I wouldn't take anymore chances or guesses. I know you said the Vet seen the horse each time, but he never actually scoped the horse, so a lot is based on "guess" and symptoms.

    Choke can also often look like colic, something you said he did right before or after a choke?

    This cough can be another sign of his throat being irritated or the esophagus having ended up with permanent damage.

    I know you said you didn't want to go the route of surgery, BUT it would still help you a lot to know exactly what you are dealing with. I would want the horse scoped.

    Just because he doesn't cough when the hay is wet, and coughs when its not, doesn't necessarily mean he is allergic to the dust. Dry hay is rougher. Could irritate his esophagus.
    You should find out if its narrowed, if there is (recent) inflammation that may yet to heal up, etc. Based on the findings you will know what you NEED to do, whether the horse likes it or not..If not, you risk the chance or re-occurrence, and each time this happens, it will make things that much worse.

    I know you also argued about feeding off the ground, saying its not needed, he was improved, etc.
    Honestly, though, at this point you should do all you can to help out that issue. Eating with the head down is the most natural position all the internal structures in the neck should hold. Esp. important when there is a narrowing, inflammation, etc.

    Your horse, your decision.

    However, when you post about these issues, you will get thoughts, opinions and advice. Its up to you what to do with it.

    I wish you and him best of luck either way :)
     
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  4. lhoward

    lhoward Senior Member

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    In case you are interested, this is what I did...

    The bags clip/tie into those big tubs, so the horse can't get them out. The tub clips to a metal hook, so the horse can't move the tub around. I have several of those hooks around the paddock, stall, so I can move those tubs around, depending on weather, rain, shade, sun, etc...

    Works great ! I can use slow down nets, the horse has its head down, the small pieces and dust fall into the tub under the net, so the horse really doesn't shake any up or breathes any in.

    You can also put hay in there that was wet down.

    If you want you can drill holes in the bottom of tub to drain water out of ...

    Here are some pics

    Hay station
     
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  5. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    If your roundbales are dusty you can stand the bale on it's end and peel off flakes, shake them out, or spray a serving with water. then fork it into a tub for him to eat out of.

    I know you do not want to hear it, but he should only be eating off the ground with his head in grazing position.
     
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  6. lhoward

    lhoward Senior Member

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    There is also this great idea of STEAMING hay. It takes the dust off, makes the hay fresh and sweet, easy to eat PLUS it kills mold.

    There are big huge and very expensive "hay steamers" that steam a whole bale. They take up space, cost a lot of money and take up a bit of time.

    Or...you could buy a steamer, one of those stand up models. A better one like a "Jiffy" is a great thing with a huge output of steam. You can often find them used in great condition. They usually just need a good descaling.

    While you fill up a couple hay bags you can turn on the steamer to preheat. After that, hang the haybags near the steamer and hit them all around real well. Should only take about 2 to 3 minutes of steaming, if you are thorough. The hay will NOT be really wet and soggy, just softer, sweet and fresh.

    You need a power source and distilled water (or descale periodically)

    Just an example , this Jiffy steamer is on my Facebook marketplace, in GREAT condition for $72. That is a steal. You can buy different attachment, one is a really wide one for drapes. That would make short work out of steaming a hay net. Even the regular attachment will work great, though.

    Google "steaming hay" and the health benefits of it...

    This is the Jiffy steamer for $72 (just for reference) you may find them for more or for less. I would not go with a cheap brand, though, rather the good one and a good used one if money is a issue.
    The one I used to have is a bigger model, the tank was the big grey body on wheels. That thing was awesome, although I used it for clothes, etc, never thought of using it on hay..

    29595227_10213832143211200_2709417140748415656_n.jpg
     
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  7. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    'coughing because the DUST of the hay'

    that's usually due to allergies, not dust (if dust means dirt) but actually to the leaves of hay that shatter and form a sort of powder with the hay, and to possibly any fungus or mold that might be getting in there too.

    Mold also makes 'dust' that seems to 'poof' out of the hay when you break a bale open. Mold like that, is usually very light and airy.

    Mold causes many horses to cough. And the other problem is that many horses actually get very sick from some types of mold that forms in hay. Generally, if I see any mold in a bale of hay - it's usually pale grey or white - and if I see it, I throw the hay away. The problem is that it's impossible to tell if that individual horse is going to have a bad reaction to that mold or not, so the best thing is to throw away hay if you find mold in your hay.

    I found mold in one load of hay and the hay producer replaced it entirely. That's what the really good hay people do.

     
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  8. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I had one like that only a tad bigger, they work well.
     
  9. Misty H

    Misty H Full Member

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    I have changed hay and buy compressed alfalfa. That is delivered right off the truck. At tractor supply. I know I don’t know how long they were sitting before delivered but I do check them for mold before I give him each flake.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2018
  10. Misty H

    Misty H Full Member

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    He has been now. He is sneezing and will let out a cough once or twice but not every time. It’s only when he is eating his hay and when it’s dry. He wouldn’t eat any when it was soaked and not having grass all the time I need him to eat hay. So now I give it a dunk in the water bin or I spray it down before I throw the flake out on the ground. He only gets one flake at a time in his barn.
     
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