They gave me a horse!

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by billz, Nov 26, 2018.

  1. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    It's got nothing to do with eccentric or opinionated. It's a fact. It's VERY difficult for people to adjust to boarding after owning a farm. I've watched that happen for 50+ years. I've also seen that when you board, you have to get along with the people you board with. And the owners and manager. It's really that simple. And it's also true that you'll never, ever find anyone that you agree on about every single thing to do with boarding. A person has to compromise, not sweat the little stuff, and just chill.
     
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  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I just meant in general SLC. It wasn't meant as a put down, eccentric is more interesting in my opinion, maybe it's just mine. I think of Auntie Mame personally in that genre.
     
  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    It is difficult when you've had your own place to adjust, understatement.
     
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  4. billz

    billz Full Member

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    I had "the hard talk" last night with the farm owner's at my present location. This was complicated because they are the people that gave me the horse for which I am now responsible. The owner's are a couple and one of them understands why I'm moving and the other is insulted and upset. :(

    Hard talks like that are tough but I believe in being truthful and honest and up front even when it's tough; like ripping off a band aid. I tried to be gentle but I don't think this would have been easy, regardless of how it's presented. My heart is hurt by this rebuff but I have to do what I think is best for everyone involved, including my horse. I have a lot of respect for these people and hope that we can remain friends through this tough spot. Only time will tell...

    Now, we can get this thread back to training reports.:rpony:
     
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  5. billz

    billz Full Member

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    I went out the farm last night just to spend some time with Sierra. I've been working on a new relationship with my girl and it is based on the methods taught by Mark Rashid using calm quiet communication techniques. This girl has a reputation to running away and refusing to be caught. I have been working with her now for almost four weeks.

    Last night, I entered the paddock and proceed to simply walk around kicking manure piles and being quiet. It took about two minutes for Sierra to notice me and catch me. I was quietly amazed as she proceeded to reach over my shoulder and begin nuzzling me as if grooming. Humbled is all I can say.

    We have a good start...
     
  6. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    That's exactly how EVERY person should catch EVERY horse. Be part of the herd, act like a horse in a herd acts. Keep your eyes where another horse would keep them and horses then do not “allert“ to your presence.

    Anyone who does it this way can catch just about any horse. Horses are instinctual: their instincts control their initial actions and reactions.
     
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  7. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    It's not uncommon to rotate stalls. Lots of people like their Cremellos and dark blacks turned out at night to keep them from fading and sunburning. It's a pretty common practice to rotate pastures as well as stalls. As long as the horses are healthy, I wouldn't worry about it. You don't own the stall, period, you rent for a place for your horse to live and his care. As long as he's being cared for appropriately, it should matter that a horse is in his stall when he is not. As far as storms, as long as there is shelter outside, I'd prefer my horse be outside, it's healthier for them to be out than cooped up in a barn with dust etc.

    The thing about boarding facilities is that you don't own them. They can make whatever rules or policies they want and your option is to leave or deal. Try not to be so judgmental. Every place you go is going to have things going on you don't like.
     
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  8. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    I’m not understand the second post, in light of the first...am I missing something? They told you they were clos8ng down and you needed to look for a new place...you looked you found, you are moving....
     
  9. billz

    billz Full Member

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    They did not tell me that I needed to find a new place. It was my choice. They informed me that I could stay until spring and that they expected to move to another facility that would be smaller and easier to take care of. In fact, I had already been searching for another facility because I could see what was happening to the health of the owner/manager that had become my friend. I felt that it would be helpful to reduce the level of stress and physical labor for this manager to move to another location to reduce his work. I had been shopping for a new place before they told me about their decision to shut down. Informing them of my decision to move was tough. I have since discovered that many boarders don't tell the management of the barn that they are leaving and some of the horror stories about boarders sneaking out in the middle of the night to avoid the "hard talk" about a choice to move is pretty irresponsible, in my opinion.
     
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  10. palogal

    palogal Senior Member

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    For any business owner, moving barns is not emotional, it's business. In this area for example, the barn owners pass around the same group of boarders over and over until they buy their own land. It's not really a "talk" that's needed, it's a written 30 day notice, handed to the owner, face to face. You're making this much more dramatic than it needs to be. You're allowed to move your horse for whatever reason you chose. They need to be professionals and see that this is business, not a relationship coming to an end.
     
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