The worst thing to come home to.....having to put down your horse.

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by meljean, Feb 2, 2019.

  1. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    I don't know about you, but the life of my horse out weighs a 5 hr drive and a little money. I don't use ANY feeders... I'm not about to have my high dollar horses breaking legs.
     
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  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    One could always do without such a feeder entirely. Many people do.

    My friend made a nifty feeder. It was made of light lumber and any pressure from a horse would break it to pieces. That's one way to go about it, but his horse actually got some nasty splinters (and an infected tendon) from it splintering on him.

    I've also seen a little 'rooflet' attached to a barn so it is over a hay net and the hay net suspended from the building.

    I'm designing a hay feeder too. It's been slow going since I have little time to work on it, but it's going to be FABULOUS.
     
  3. tlwidener

    tlwidener Senior Member

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    I think those feeders are reallyt unnecessary. I mean...just feed on the ground? IMO the plastic ones are way over priced, and the metal rings aren't safe.

    And FWIW it's impossible to find round bales of good alfalfa in my area anyway. Nearly all the hay around me is put up in big squares. No grass hay is grown where I am.

    Everything horse related is over priced. The horse industry is ridiculous.
     
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  4. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    So put the hay on the ground where it gets wasted and ruined? Not me.
     
  5. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    I used to just put the rounds out, and I had SO much waste... it drove me nuts. once the size of the herd increased, I had to cut back on all that waste. I started making my own nets, but they seemed to chew through them so fast. Finally broke down 3 winters ago and bought the Heavy Duty HayChix nets. they worked great to keep the waste down, but they were a pain in the rear to put on (I am normally putting hay out by myself), in and out of the skidsteer several times to put the net on, pull twine or net wrap, roll bale, then cinch of the net.

    So, I bought 2 of the Century Plastic feeders and attached the net to the bottom ring. SO much easier. I set the bales, get out and take twine off, then lift the feeder with net attached and slide over the bale. Right now, i'm feeding first cutting rounds and the guy that baled them for us did a horrible job... they are small and really loose, so very oval shaped. I have placement down to a science and can get 2 in each feeder! lol. we have one metal horse feeder (no uprights) that i'm going to replace with one of the plastic ones when I get a little extra $... as there are 11 in that field, so I have 3 feeders set up for them.
     
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  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Plastic does not equal injury free. Lady down the street, her stallion got a cut on a plastic barrel that cost a grand to stitch up. Left quite a scar.

     
  7. Faster Horses

    Faster Horses Senior Member

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    If it was a regular HDPE plastic barrel, they do not take temp changes well. The plastic gets brittle and sharp.

    Hopefully the plastic round bale feeders use a plastic more well suited to cold temps.
     
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  8. Lopinslow

    Lopinslow Senior Member

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    totally different plastic. I have really pushed on these with the skidloader, even in minus temps and they are fine.
    May 12-16-18.jpg
     
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  9. sherian

    sherian Senior Member

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    I believe the ones @Circle C posted are made out of something similar to the rubbermaid water troughs which are fine in serious winter temps ( the troughs do burn spectactularly if they catch though so while good for the cold best to be careful with trough heaters though)
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I like yours better.
     

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