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Featured The reasons I became a crazy barn owner.

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Kristal H, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    No lounge at my place, alas. No chandeliers either. BUT my barn owners also run a vineyard so there's a tasting room on the ranch and I get discounts on wine. :D
     
  2. StarPattern

    StarPattern Senior Member

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    Hah! Message me and I'll confirm if you're right. :p
     
  3. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    LOL if you drink enough wine...then its like boarding for free!
     
    rhinebeck, VermilionStrife and Binca like this.
  4. uncanny580

    uncanny580 Senior Member

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    Haha there are actually a couple I think it could!

    I went to my barn at home (5 hr away) when I was there over the holidays - going back there makes me miss it. Everything is so normal there. Not like in the city...
     
  5. TallOak10

    TallOak10 Full Member

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    OMG Kristal H! Girl you have A TON of patience!!!

    I watched my last BO deal with a boarder who sounded like almost everyone you described all rolled up into ONE MESS OF A WOMAN. Her husband purchased a handful of dollar stores when dollar stores were first up and coming. Pretty soon, they were loaded. Equipt with cleaning people, pool people, luxury cars -- and luxury everything. Great for them! People often buy buy buy even when they don't know know know. Fast and furiously, she wanted horse. (God help us all) Grown woman, battling lupus, minimally active to totally INACTIVE by nature let alone infirmity, but she wanted a horse -- because she could. These fast and furious horse owners are the worse kind of boarders. My BO was a very laid back woman. She knew her stuff and took no guff. I watched my very laid back, been there, done that, handled herself hauling and kicking barrel butt all over the country, working in MAN-LAND for many years on the track -- BO -- become a TOTAL NUT because of ...*Rhoda. Rhoda bought a very green Arab with a knee issue. COMPLETE SWEET HEART of a horse, but green, randomly lame and spirited.

    The rest of us, just... stayed out of the way. It was a rough two years that eventually turned into her taking her Arab to auction for a 'better horse. Thank GOD he was purchased by a little girl -- solid little rider -- who was light enough not to stress his knee if she didn't intend to jump. *Rhoda then bought a gorgeous papered QH who was BRED UP THE YIN YANG, who hated HER guts, and hated EVERYONE'S guts for that matter. He was NOT a nice horse. Couldn't be trusted but according to *Rhonda, was a "much better horse" -- that she quickly couldn't handle. She started paying other boarders to retrieve, hold, turnout, etc for farrier, medicine, dentist, whatever etc... The one day I went out to retrieve him for the farrier, he came right up to me, like a good boy (I didn't know him yet) I went to give him a scratch before attaching him to the lead line. He head butted me clear off my feet and onto my a***. HOOOOOOOLY MOOOOOOOOOLY! Never before or since, have I experienced that.

    Eventually BO asked her to leave. She went to a large riding center/ hunter jumper competition barn with two known area trainers full time on premises. Within one month, we heard that she was not allowed to retrieve her horse by herself. (How many did she let loose, we wondered.) Within two or three months, she wasn't allowed to trot anywhere but in an arena and within another month or so, she wasn't allowed to canter ANYWHERE at ANYTIME on the property without a trainer present.

    So hats off to you. Inside my head I bellowed the words, "WHEN I HAVE MY OWN FARM, I'LL NEVER BOARD OTHER PEOPLES' HORSES."

    I of course ate my words. I don't do the kid-thing, or even adult-rider-thing. I do the RETIRED-HORSE thing. I didn't intend on it. It just happened. People who are used to paying mad money in fox hunting country are very happy to pay me what is considered pricey in THIS area, but to me is fair, for their horse to live in a private quiet setting, fed and hayed three times a day, with heated water troughs, their own stall, overhang, and paddock, blanketing to their owner's specifications and any supplementation added that is provided, groomed weekly, hooves picked two-to-three times a week, deworming included, psyllium program included (I am on sand), massaged at extra expense if wanted. Pictures and updates sent weekly. The beauty is, the horses are retired. The owners do not come often, even though of course they can come whenever they want. I don't have the added liability of kids running all over the place when I'm not home, nor the concern that someone will steal their tack or mine. It totally works.

    But again, hats off to all of you BO's who have the patience for the learners. We all had to learn some time. And without YOU.... there'd be no US!
     
  6. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    You're lucky.;)
     
  7. TallOak10

    TallOak10 Full Member

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    Why? Because I board retired horses or because that mean horse didn't beat the crap out of me? LOL
     
  8. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    [QUactuall llOak10, post: 8063471, member: 83093"]Why? Because I board retired horses or because that mean horse didn't beat the crap out of me? LOL[/QUOTE]

    both-!! Hey, I can literally see that happening. He'd probably suprised most of us. Dang lug.

    Primarily the former though..no stress, no nuts - lucky.;)
     
  9. TallOak10

    TallOak10 Full Member

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    both-!! Hey, I can literally see that happening. He'd probably suprised most of us. Dang lug.

    Primarily the former though..no stress, no nuts - lucky.;)[/QUOTE]
    Lol -- well he sure is shocked me! I was like, "Holy good God what just happened? " :faint:but yeah, the boarding thing just kind of happened. Very good friends older horse and needed a change of scenery. One of my horses had passed away a few months earlier. So I had the room. I really did not want to do it. I wasn't emotionally ready. But then he pulled the old, "PLEASE! He won't survive out here. ":eek::cry::(:bawling: Sigh, and that's how my boarding retired horses began.
     
  10. all4him

    all4him Senior Member

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    Even running retirement can be stressful. My friend has a retirement farm for the last 2 years and there have now been 2 horses who should have been put down months earlier but the owner wasn't around to see how bad the horse was and they would cry "I just can't put her down! I love her!" Just last week we were up there and there was a mare down - hard. She had a bad shoulder injury from years ago and she could hardly put weight on that shoulder so she limped around the pasture. Fortunately my friend is a wonderful horse woman who would bring her grain out to her in the field, got bute (paid for it herself) and tried some MSM on her too. She did everything she could but the lady just didn't want to put her down. "She's still eating so she's OK." UGH!! So last week the mare was laying down flat in the mud. We went out and put hay under her head and neck so at least she wasn't laying in mud and we had fed her some grain and hay. After about 5 hours she got up for a bit but then laid back down again. The owner wasn't even answering the phone anymore at this point. I told my friend to leave a message "Your horse is down. Call the vet now. She needs to be put down." Fortunately the sweet thing was finally put down on Tuesday but IMO, that was about 6 months too late. What can a barn owner do if the horse owner doesn't agree to put a horse down? They had another one die of cancer on the property after dropping literally every ounce of anything on her - she was SOO disgustingly thin despite them hand feeding her and having the vet out weekly. The owner just wouldn't put her down and that poor horse had to die on her own. :(
     
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