The Calypso everything thread!

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by Dona Worry, Feb 27, 2017.

  1. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    I once saw a woman put a lead rope around her neck. The horse was a spooky percheron cross. Huge mare could have killed her in an instant.

    Yes - I had to say something.

    Sometimes we need to look out for others.
     
  2. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    nobody had a problem with the first post. My first impulse was to write a similar post to @bobo and horses '.
    But when the OP clarifies that the pic only gives the impression of "doing the thing" and that they have experienced first hand how dangerous it is to "do the thing" there 's no need to bring it up again. Especially in that manner...
     
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  3. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Whatever....enjoy your day......me I’m off to take another round of meds....

    Most people have good intentions, some don’t
     
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  4. peg4x4

    peg4x4 Senior Member

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    I see she is wearing her bit,like a good girl
     
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  5. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    :confused:
    I've spoken up before too, usually kids who think that they have a spiritual connection with their show calf and are therefore immune from harm
     
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  6. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Not sure if she was showing off or the time off and the walk did her good, but Calypso nailed each and every transition like a BOSS tonight. She even managed a lap at a CONTROLLED canter! That is a first for her, usually the canter is a mess and she can only keep it for a few strides.
     
  7. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    So the lungeing is going well!




    Really well.





    Too well.





    I may be over thinking this. I acknowledge that. But. . .


    Does lungeing a horse in a round pen teach them anything other than follow the wall of the pen?


    When NOT in the pen, she tends to be less consistent. She will lean out, pull on the line occasionally, maybe even attempt an escape. Not every time, obviously, but enough to make sure you are paying attention. In the round pen, she is a perfect angel--goes to work with a will! Nails the transitions! Could go all day and all night! Bends correctly! Even hits the canter!

    But. . . I feel like it is because she is in the pen, and knows there isn't anywhere to go, so she may as well just buckle down and work, if that makes sense.
    I'd like to lunge her outside the pen, but just don't have a great place to do so. I could lunge her in an area outside my house, but the grass is tallish, and it is not level.

    Am I overthinking this?
     
  8. ginster

    ginster Senior Member

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    She learned that being in the pen means she is expected to work. Outside you have been doing a lot of fun stuff, less focused than in the pen so she is less consistent there.
    You should find a place outside that you just use when you work her. So that she makes the connection that she is expected to work when there, too.
    That said: I am really not sure if all that longeing is doing anything much for her... it was usual to "work" horses on the longeline in the barns I rode at. If done right, it helps with elasticity, can teach them to work over their back and really use their hind end. But for most of those horses, simply riding them would´ve been much more effective.
    I think I wrote about the mare who flipped over and had really hurt her back? She was slowly brought back into work and once she had some balance she was worked slowly and carefully on the longe. It helped her regain her balance more and more. For her, this was a tool that worked.
    So in regards to getting more balanced, I am sure it helped Calypso. The question is if she still needs to be longed three or more times a wekk..
    Do you have an area where you can do some pole work with her?
     
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  9. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    Calypso is more learning about reins and contact in a way that is safe for everyone involved, but the difference in her balance with and without the side reins is so dramatic even I notice it! I am not 100% sure what the science is, but when she has the side reins on its like her hind feet can reach under her better-- she not only steps into the track of her front feet, but in front of them, and the most successful, even canters happen with the side reins. She doesn't appear to be leaning on them-- almost the opposite-- but she is absolutely still learning from the lungeing, and I think she knows she is learning. . .
    But I wonder if the walls of the round pen are hindering or helping?!
    I am still looking for a little area to call my own for working with her.
    1500 acres, and no room for my poor pony. :no:
     
  10. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I wouldn't choose to longe a horse in a round pen. Those 'occasional moments of pulling out, even attempts to escape' without the round pen are where a ton of actual training takes place. Having everything always go well is comfortable, but it often means important questions are being avoided. There is, however, a time and place for 'avoiding important questions.' It takes a lot of experience to transition a horse from longeing in a restricted area and longeing out in a big field. It's something you might consider doing while there is someone there to help you, and to step in and take the horse is need be.

    I don't mind longeing in an arena, especially when the open side of the circle is toward the gate/exit, then you get a lot of practice with maintaining the same rhythm all the way around the circle and the horse needing to turn instead of running back to the gate.

    There is always that moment when a person takes a horse out of the enclosed area and then the horse starts really learning. Longeing and riding a horse - training him (or her...) outdoors, with no fence to rely on, is an important step in training.

    There is an old saying, 'Don't let the rail ride the horse.' Which means that in an enclosed area the fence is doing some of the steering and controlling of the horse. With a youngster who doesn't know anything it is an important safety measure. Once the horse gets to a certain point in the training, it starts to be a hindrance.

    That's one reason why the more 'advanced' figures in dressage take place away from the rail or arena wall. Because at a point, the rider has to be riding the horse and not relying on the rail.

    As for side reins creating a more balanced horse, that is the whole point of using sidereins. The key is in getting the side reins the right length, and having enough forward energy.

     

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