Texas Prison Horses

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by RoyalJulie, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. RoyalJulie

    RoyalJulie Senior Member

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    Anyone have one?

    I'd like some input:

    1. I understand the age branding, but what are the rest of the brands?

    2. What is the youngest age they retire them? I heard 15-20 but I'd like something even a little younger...

    3. Do they accurately report all their lameness/illness issues?

    4. If you have one, would you buy that same horse again knowing what you know now?


    Our situation: We have 2 horses currently and 5 small children. We are looking for (another) versatile horse who will be able to give my little kids confidence and yet still be able to go on trails with my husband or myself. In a perfect world, I'd also like to get on this horse and work on some basic dressage to try and get my mojo back. However, the #1, #2, and #3 thing is safety. Period.
     
  2. FancyASB

    FancyASB Senior Member+

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    The girl that writes Horse and Man has a prison trained Mustang she just loves him. You can ask her: http://horseandman.com/
     
  3. RoyalJulie

    RoyalJulie Senior Member

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    I know two people that have prison horses and they both claim they are the best horses they've ever owned. I don't know a lot of details, though.
     
  4. cassiem

    cassiem Senior Member

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    Wait, what are prison trained horses...?
     
  5. Simply

    Simply Senior Member

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    Whats a Texas Prison Horse? is that like when inmates train service dogs?
     
  6. RoyalJulie

    RoyalJulie Senior Member

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    I am pretty sure the prisoners train them. There are different types: some are retiring for various reasons and some are found unfit for the program. They breed them to be big and stout. I obviously don't want the unfit for the program ones....I want one that has been retired from the program due to either age or mild/managable soundness issues. The ones I want have been ridden by the prison employees to either patrol the grounds or manage the cows or other agriculture. They are ridden day in and day out and do just about anything.

    They are in high demand and rarely ever sold in the public from person to person. However, years ago the public made a big stink because it was veryyy hard to ever find one for sale. You pretty much had to know someone to get one. Now, they take them strictly to auctions and you know what auction prices are. They go for cheap. I have been told that they won't let you ride or even touch them at the sale barn because they are state property (not sure if this is true) but that they do come with a list of lameness issues and riding issues, if applicable. Not sure about that, either.

    Looking for someone experienced to tell me!
     
  7. CaitlynH

    CaitlynH Senior Member+

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    I work for a trader that gets a lot of prison horses.

    You know as much about them as any other auction horse, even less a lot of times, the only thing you can really count on is their age. Even the horses that don't make the cut are some of the most broke horses you will ever throw a leg over. We have gotten both horses in that were super calm to very hot, that depends on if they were guards horses or they worked the cattle. The MAJORITY of the ones I have seen have lameness issues and are in desperate need of some chiropractic work from terrible fitting saddles.


     
  8. RoyalJulie

    RoyalJulie Senior Member

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    Thanks for all the info. I didn't know that the horses that didn't work out were still decent. Is it OK if I PM you?


    Does anyone else have any input?

    Thanks :)
     
  9. OctagonalStar

    OctagonalStar Senior Member

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    My experience with the Prison Horses are the ones from the Huntsville Prison. When I was at A&M, I took an Equine Management course (ANSC 420) and the main project was to foal out 2 mares. The Horse Center (and A&M) had partnered with the Prison to use some of their broodmares for a research project as well as for 420. The information we got on the mares was minimal - a barn name, color, markings, age, and who they were bred to (also by barn name.) I think most of the mares were in the 8-12 year old range. A&M was to return the mares with the foals at side with the mares re-bred to the stallions that were standing at A&M at the time. Most of these mares (the one I helped foal out included) were bred to Clinton Anderson's Jag (Chicoutmyblingbling).

    The prison does not usually use the mares in everyday service - they prefer to use geldings, as they tend to have a steadier temperament. I'm honestly not sure if any of the mares were broke to ride. The prison did prefer to use part draft horses for the guards to ride, and I doubt that any of the horses were registered, but I know the prison does produce some VERY nicely bred horses.

    All of the Huntsville Prison Horses are branded with a star on the left front shoulder, as well as some numbers for the date of birth. I have actually come across a few of them for sale, but they were all from individuals and not from the prison.

    Perhaps you could contact the prison for more information directly from the source?
     
  10. OctagonalStar

    OctagonalStar Senior Member

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