Teething Horses - Biting!

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by prince28, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. prince28

    prince28 Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a 3 year old horse called Toppie who is loosing his baby teeth and he has a constant urge to chew/bite things including me! I don't want to smack him because he'll start biting even faster! What can I do?:eek:
     






  2. Ashstud

    Ashstud Full Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2006
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    3
    You.do.need.to.stop.the.biting.of.you.ASAP....it.could.turn.into.a.more.meaningful
    discipline.problem.later.on.

    I'm.sorry.all.you.horse.lovers.out.there.....but.when.a.horse.bites.my.hubby.they.
    get.one.swift.hit.on.the.nose.and.99%.of.the.time...they.don't.try.it.again.
     
  3. Jenje!

    Jenje! Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2005
    Messages:
    8,560
    Likes Received:
    3,059
    Why would he start biting faster if you smack him? :confused: If you smack him appropriately and he goes for you again, he either has some serious respect issues that need working on or you're being too kind with him, and he thinks you're playing.

    Teething is no excuse for biting. Give him a quick, calculated slap in the side of the mouth when he puts his mouth on you (big no-no) and then leave him alone, don't dwell on it.
     
  4. freedom32

    freedom32 Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    12,097
    Likes Received:
    7,880
    Biting people is NOT acceptable behaviour, ever, and needs corrected. When Freedom was teething she enjoyed chewing on her Jolly Ball, might be a thought for you, a partially deflated basketball would work as well.
     
  5. rageandglory

    rageandglory Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,469
    Likes Received:
    202
    agreed. a designated chew toy would be recommended here. and to try to keep YOUR parts out of range as much as possible : )
     
  6. Dawn

    Dawn Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    45,411
    Likes Received:
    2,685
    He's probably biting/chewing out of pain. That does not make it acceptable though. Give him some time off for his mouth to heal and take things easy with him. Keep yourself out of the situation of him trying to bite you in the first place. But if he does try, then he has to be reprimanded.
     
  7. WildHorseSpirit

    WildHorseSpirit Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2005
    Messages:
    1,487
    Likes Received:
    279
    I have been known to bite em back! Not hard but enough to establish my Boss Mare attitude.
    I have also given my 3yo a smack or two but she likes to fight back so I do my Mustang Boss thing when I jump at her shooing her away and she minds that LOL She comes back with her teeth in her mouth and not at me.

    I have a problem with her kicking out when her back hooves are held since the former neighbor used her as a practice dummy for her herding dogs one did not back off on command and bit the crud out of my filly. I found out this and I was hot to say the least.
    So now I may have to take my sneaker toe and kick her back! I did it to her mom and auntie when they were younger.

    See in the wild and in herds if you watch how they handle it you can learn how to handle it when the youngster tries it on you. Don't be abusive but be firm about it.

    This same filly had a pawing the fence problem, she respects the lunge whip so we crack it and holler away and she does! No more pawing that fence without that whip coming out. LOL

    So flame me LOL :) I know what worked and what hasn't yep tried all the patting and working on the leg, it wasn't me stroking the leg that is the problem but actually picking it up. She never had this major problem before.
    So, you have to take in consideration the horse, the problem and go from there.

    PS as John Lyons says you and your horse should not get hurt how true! I can't remember how he says it forgive me.
     
  8. Vengeance

    Vengeance Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,183
    Likes Received:
    121
    Any time the horse comes at you to bite, whether in play or in pain, or meaning it seriously, draw back and let them have it in the mouth!

    Stopped my colt from biting...one good punch in the mouth and he quit.

    Stopped my mare from biting/snapping...a smartly placed hit in the right spot is better than a million 'soft' or wrongly placed hits.

    Stopped the other mare too...only I accidentally used a metal catch on a lead rope...meant to use my fist...but the lead got in the way and hit her instead...but it stopped her, and she's got no issues from it.
     
  9. WildHorseSpirit

    WildHorseSpirit Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2005
    Messages:
    1,487
    Likes Received:
    279
    V accidents happen I am sure she don't hold it against you.
    You worry about correcting the behavior at that moment and the catch got in the way
     
  10. Dawn

    Dawn Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    45,411
    Likes Received:
    2,685
    Personally, I'm not of the train of thought that hitting a horse will keep it from biting. (Actually I do not advocate hitting/striking the horse in the head area at all.)

    Gain your horse's respect (not fear) and they will not be disrespectful to you. Again, pain can push the limits of respect. But the boundary will still be there. Striking your horse will not instill any respect in it at all.
     






Share This Page