Teeth Question

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by crayon, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. crayon

    crayon Senior Member

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    So I happened to get this picture today. As many of you know I was asst from home for a few years so this is the first time I saw her teeth since getting back. She's about to turn 13 and I'm worried it looks like there's some excess wear... She's never been a cribber but I noticed once I got back (oddly) she started chewing some of the wood around her stall. Her stall is open to the outdoors 24/7 and it seems like she's been walking around more lately with the better weather so hopefully the chewing is over with... Thoughts on these teeth? I suppose not nug could be done anyway other than spraying some yucky stuff on the wood.

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  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Probably bored and chewing on stuff. And perhaps she was only fed twice a day. It doesn't really look that bad.
     
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  3. crayon

    crayon Senior Member

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    Yes she was only fed twice a day until I got home and started feeding her 3 times. Hopefully she's done chewing things other than food now. As long as it doesn't look too bad and doesn't get any more worn down that's good. ^^
     
  4. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

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    Nothing the dental tech/vet can't fix up. It isn't bad at all!
     
  5. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    She uses the near side of her front teeth more than the off side. Get her teeth floated, BUT, the fronts, so long as they are meeting evenly with their matching bottoms, leave alone.

    You only mess with those if necessary because the incisors are much more sensitive than the molars, you have to sedate the horse for that. No sense working on those just to make them look even.
     
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  6. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

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    I disagree. This, being left alone, will continue to worsen over time as an odd wear pattern has already begun. This WILL affect the cheek teeth in time, and as the incisors get longer, it puts more pressure on the TMJ and lessens the efficiency of the chewing teeth.

    This should be corrected before it's left to get out of hand over the next years to come.
     
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  7. Mule.girl

    Mule.girl Senior Member

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    I would have a vet look at it and straighten it up if applicable.I think it you straighten it up and then you have problems again I would agree that either shes eating/chewing on wood and such or there is a anatomical reason shes wearing like that. Maybe her molars are causing her grinding to be wonky or wear wonky (if that makes sense put that way). Not knowing how she eats (drops or what not) or other things though I have seen a few with a odd wear problem but it was only the front two due to the gelding chewing on the water stock tank and his stall boards.
    What a great picture its like you asked her to show her teeth for the pic!
     
  8. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Yep.
    You have to address the molars FIRST because this could be from a wave developing, or just from a bad hook on the opposite side and once the molars are corrected, the incisors will straighten themselves out quickly.

    Incisors are just not made the same as molars are: Incisors are for nipping, Molars are for grinding: their composition is different.
     
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  9. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    I'm with @NaeNae. This can really reek havoc on the TMJ. In fact, the TMJ being out of what could be what's causing the wood chewing - some kind of way to help alleviate it.

    I'm going to guess she's due for her yearly float anyways & perhaps that is really all it is - her yearly float being due, and you just so happen to catch the perfect shot in time to showcase it.

    I would guess if you looked at her teeth touching that you'd see the slight wave that is present in the top incisors in the photo (bottoms would be mirror), and if I had to wager money, I'd say the wave gets worse as you look further back in her mouth. Good thing is, it's caught pretty darn quickly - as this is just the start of it. So a quick float should have it right fixed up :)
     
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  10. NaeNae

    NaeNae Senior Member

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    Yup. A lot of people say don't mess with incisors, only float the cheek teeth. But care and balance needs to be taken with both. Longer the incisors = more pressure on TMJ = bad bad bad.

    They look fine lengthwise in this picture, but I would level off the 102, 103, 202, 203 and then I'm betting if we could see the lower arcade, the 301 and 401 would need to come down a bit too.
     
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