Teared muscle

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by Picture Perfect, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. Picture Perfect

    Picture Perfect Full Member

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    Anyone has experience with a tear muscle? My 3 year old got a back kick back in august just near her left scapula. It was quite swollen for a few days and cold hosing + butazone wouln’t get it down. My vet was contacted and I was told it was more than likely a built up of fluid (or blood) and that it should go down on it’s own one day or the other, not to worry about it, and continue our normal riding routine if there was no disconfort/heat/lameness which she wasn’t. Fast forward to about 2 weeks ago, the built up did finaly go away, but now, at that exact same spot, she has a huge lump popping out of the scapula when she backs up her left front. My vet was out last week and I was told it more than likely teared the muscle and it created that lump as the fibers were healing.

    Now, my question is, anyone ever experienced this? Any exercises I can do the break down these fibers a bit or should I just let it be? My REMT will be in the area soon and she will be looked at by her also.

    The pictures I am attaching are from august when she originally got kicked. AC79AB17-9B20-45F8-B629-7647918A56A8.jpeg BB5B57F3-718F-4F66-B087-90CEEB3A2EEB.jpeg
     
  2. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    If it isn't sore just leave it be. It will go down over time. Far from her heart, as the saying goes.
     
  3. emali06

    emali06 Senior Member

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    Is it hard or squishy? Waylon slipped and hit the ground HARD this summer. I could feel the tear in his hind end and he had a very VERY large hematoma for a few weeks. The tear I felt eventually went away and now the spot just sweats. Its may not be the same thing but time healed him.

    36605708_10216914201116089_8519519642564165632_n.jpg
     
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  4. RG NIGHT HEIR

    RG NIGHT HEIR Senior Member

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    Sorry, but I need to say this:
    TORN muscle.
     
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  5. mooselady

    mooselady Senior Member

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    Thank you!
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Swellings like this from kicks are generally assumed to be only hematomas, or collection of fluid and blood.

    BUT...hematomas will start reducing within a day or two and are generally completely gone within a week or two. If the swelling persists for longer than a few more days or does not respond well to simple treatment(bute, cold water), something other than a hematoma is responsible(or there is a hematoma AND another injury beneath it).

    The other horse's injury, to the mass of muscle on the hind quarter, is very different. Given the huge mass of muscle at that location, it is more likely to only be a bruise and is (usually) much less concerning than a forceful kick wound to a shoulder, which has much more exposed bone, nerves and soft tissue other than muscle.

    This risk of a more complex injury is particularly likely with forceful kick injuries to the shoulder like this one.

    This injury appears to be almost completely behind the scapula, but it is a particularly complicated area and forceful kick injuries here can be very serious. Broken ribs are very possible.

    If the swelling persists for longer than expected, then you should definitely suspect that there is something more serious going on and change your course of action. And after the swelling persists longer than expected(a few days), the vet's over-the-phone comments are no longer applicable.

    At this point, it has been two to three months since the injury occurred and there is still a swelling. That is very concerning(though there are no pictures of it nor is its size described, so it is in fact difficult to know how concerned to be).

    There are a couple possibilities at this point.

    One is that there is a persistent infection in the bone or muscle or connective tissue(or several of these), and that stepping backwards causes the muscles to compress and push the swelling outward, where it can be seen again.

    A muscle, bone or soft tissue infection would require immediate medical attention. The trouble is that bruised tissues become infected very easily as circulation is impaired.

    The other possibility is that there is a calcification on the muscle or an actual fracture on the scapula or other bone(or there is both). In that case, the bump will generally not completely go away and there isn't any effective treatment(unless there is material under the skin, such as bone chips or calcifications that need to be removed), but there are many quack 'cures' people will insist you try.

    When a horse is kicked on that location, with that much force, a fracture, nerve injury, or longer term muscle injury is very likely.

    Shoulder kick injuries can involve hematoma, but also underlying muscle, soft tissue, bone and nerves, all at the same time. That makes shoulder kick injuries particularly serious.

    I would do this if it were my horse. I'd get the vet to come out, and have a blood test run to see if there is an infection. I'd have the area ultrasounded or xrayed(xrays are cheap now with portable machines, and ultrasounds are routine), to see exactly which structures were injured, and if there is still a pocket of infection, fluid or a bone fragment that needs to be removed. I'd have the vet (if he's good at lameness detection) evaluate the horse for lameness(shoulder lameness often looks quite unlike other lamenesses).

    For future reference, a suggestion: do not drive, ride or saddle a horse with an injury in this location until the swelling is completely gone, even if the horse is not lame. The saddle will compress and irritate the swelling, and encourage infection, at the very least, delay healing. Also, another suggestion: when swellings persist for longer than expected, suspect a much more complex or serious injury, and have the vet out at that point in time. And finally: it might be prudent to separate this horse from the one that kicked her. The next time, the injury might be a lot worse.

     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
  7. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    I would just let it be if she's not sore or anything. Have you ever had a really hard hit somewhere on your body? I was pushed into a fan on the wall when my horse got too close to the wall and had a massive hematoma on my leg. It lasted for a good while and it's finally gone now, but on that spot I still have a small lump. It doesn't hurt or bother me in any way, and I don't know how long it will take for that to go away. That was back in August. So if it doesn't seem to cause any discomfort to your horse then I wouldn't worry too much.
     
  8. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    I would definitely be massaging it, but that is something I'm very comfortable doing. If it still felt like fluid, massage won't hurt but should be done differently than with a muscle tear or, at this point, an area with some fibrotic changes. You can prevent and help reduce fibrotic changes (scar tissue within the muscle) with massage to disrupt abnormal tissue development and help normal muscle tissue lay down in the correct direction. Honestly even currying around the area as deep as the horse will tolerate may be helpful if the area feels firm and knotted at this point. Gentle currying can help get fluid down if the area still feels like fluid.
     
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  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I'd take the same tack, were it not for the location of the original injury, the anatomy of he area and the forcefulness of the original injury, the extremely long time the swelling persisted, that a vet never saw the original injury, and the presence after 2-3 months of a swelling that changes in appearance with the movement of the foreleg.
     
  10. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    This actually has a name I can't remember. A friend's horse had this in a hind leg. The horse was on stall rest for the injury. As the horse healed without full movement of the limb, the muscles healed together in a knot and restricted full movement. If left too long, surgery is required to free the bound muscles.
     
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