Teaching Neck Reining

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Mcdreamer, Jun 30, 2018.

  1. maddielj97

    maddielj97 Registered

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    This is how I teach the neck rein; gaited or non gaited, it is taught the same way.

    If your horse knows how to move off leg, you are on the right track. Being able to move off leg makes it a lot easier to teach the neck rein although not completely necessary.

    Four simple steps. The hard part is repeating it enough to make it muscle memory and engraved into their brain.

    1. Lay the outside rein on their neck, don’t cross the rein to the opposite side-it causes it to pull on their mouth, just lay it on the sidebar of the neck.

    2. If they don’t do anything, which they usually don’t at first, use the inside rein to guide them in the direction you are asking.

    3. Adding leg until they make a more clear turn, this helps make it more clear to them.

    4. Release all aids once they have started to turn into the direction you asked.
     
  2. Circle C

    Circle C Senior Member

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    You shouldn't have to purposely teach them to neck rein. A horse that's been trained correctly will just do it.

    When you are training, use BOTH reins. The inside rein to indirect rein and lay the outside rein on the neck at the same time. Teach them to move off leg. They just start neck reining themselves after a while. All my horses neck rein, but I've never actually focused on neck reining.
     
  3. maddielj97

    maddielj97 Registered

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    I agree to this
     
  4. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    Unfortunately neither of them were really trained correctly. One was a show horse so he just needed to gait (with the rider leaning way back so riding with your seat is somewhat laughable. The other one was bought and sold at a farm that specializes in gaited trail horses. So mainly ridden by people who don't know how to ride.

    Oliver is getting pretty good with it. I've been riding him for over 5 years so he's getting really good at going with my body. I'm not riding henry that much right now since I pulled his shoes but I've been direct rein with him with a leg cue at the same time hoping he'll pick it up fast.
     
  5. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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  6. Jenna Scott

    Jenna Scott Registered

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    i am also trying to transition my horse from bit reined to neck reined, and i have a plan.

    i haven't had the chance to try this but i have a plan and i hope it will work.
    I am going to stand on the ground beside her and have a rope around her neck free from any bridles, bits or even the halter. then i'm going to to pull on the rope so it puts pressure on the one side, when she softly moves her head towards me, i will release the pressure and praise her.
    i like to train with pressure and release/ positive reinforcements. i will continue with this action on both sides until she does it very quickly after i ask of it. then with the same neck rope i will do it in the saddle this will hopefully project from the action i received on the ground. then when she respond to lighter pressure she will respond to the lighter pressure that is used when you have the bridle on and the bit in her mouth.
    i have no idea if this will work but it is the same way that i thought her to flex by applying and releasing pressure. and she flexes well.

    if this doesn't work or this method is not for you, you can try having split reins and crossing them so the right side of the bit is in your left hand and vise versa. they will be very confused at first and might react but if her start slowly and gentle they will catch on.

    hope i helped and good luck
     
  7. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Nay, nay, nay. Ride with your body for cue one. Look the way you want to go. Neck reining is accomplished by the horse responding to your body, not to rein cues. When you look where you want to go, your body follows.

    Read the whole thread. I have gotten on horses trained English and neck reined them when they have never been asked to neck rein before in their entire life. They do it immediately because my body tells them where to go. That's your ultimate goal: the horse follows you, your body. You do not ride them by steering the head..
     
  8. KaylaG

    KaylaG Full Member

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    My husband bought his first horse last fall. This horse is said to be a quarter horse type, gaited but I believe he has some draft in him due to his size and big head. His “gait” if it is so is very bouncy and akward looking at a trot. I thought gaited horses were supposed to move smoothly and gracious like? Maybe we were misinformed? We got a good deal on him due to the previous owner having issues with him on bucking her off. She was afraid and wanted him gone. I’m just trying to figure out what he is so we know what to do with him.
     
  9. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    Sounds like the possibility of a TWH with a "big head" Do you have any pictures of the horse? Sounds like this horse wasn't very well trained or has some pain.
     
  10. KaylaG

    KaylaG Full Member

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    EB83C1F9-4821-44A3-8262-81AA5E81D3F6.jpeg AAE49695-86DB-43E1-A999-247BC1D6A652.jpeg My apologies I thought I was posting this in a “gaited horse” thread lol keep in mind my husband is 6’ and stout. He got this horse for his size.
     

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