Talk to me about PPID/Cushing's...

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by DocsLglyBlonde, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    :cry: The results of Jessie's TRH test came back, and she most definitely has Cushing's. Her resting ACTH levels were over 300 (normal being around 30) and after the TRH injection it was over 1000 (normal being under 110). Thankfully her insulin test was normal, so her diet is most definitely working for her on that front.

    I have known many horses with PPID, most of which were started on Prascend after more severe symptoms. Jessie's coat was most concerning, but she's been a little depressed imo too. She's had no laminitis (foundered 2014 with no further issues), and has lost topline but within normal limits for her age I'd say. She just turned 18. Prascend was ordered tonight.

    So, tell me about the little things I might not know about. Her diet is solid (I'm switching her from Equipride to Horsetech High Point with a stabilized flax base, tested low sugar hay, and Quiessence). The only thing I might look into is a vitamin E and possibly C supplement for antioxidant effects. Does anyone have good clipper rec's for Cushing's horses? I have Andis 2 speed and they have done fine, but I go through blades like once every to every other body clip and it does seem to take a while with them. I might invest in some better ones since clipping will be a regular occurrence for her now (I had to clip her already this spring). Should I start with a low dose of Prascend and build up over the course of a week or two? I was reading that might help lessen side effects.

    Any other magic tricks, special supplememts, words of wisdom from those more experienced with it than me? A photo of my favorite girl because threads are dumb without photos :rolleyes:
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  2. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    I hate it. Hate it. That's all I have to say on it for now.
     
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  3. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    I wish I knew more about it and could be helpful. Jingling for you and her for sure, it can't be easy. ;)
     
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  4. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    Those have pretty much always been my feelings about it, and I don't anticipate them to change any time soon :(

    Thank you :heartbeat: I can only do so much, but I hope she has many more happy years left.
     
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  5. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    My only experience is one friend whose horse was both IR/PPID.

    You've got the diet covered, so my best advice, based on her horse is to keep those hooves in excellent condition with as frequent of trims as necessary. That can mean 4-6 week trims, depending how fast her hooves grow.

    You also have to do your due diligence in between farrier visits by keeping the hooves clean and applying meds if she develops thrush or wall separation.

    One thing my friend could not prevent was abscess after abscess after abscess during her horse's last year.
    Keeping those white lines solid is crucial to prevent what we old timers call "graveling", or small pieces of stone working their way up into the hoof which is another way abscesses start.

    In the end, her horse's immune system was low, he ended up with pneumonia, PTS'd and laid to rest on their farm.

    One thing I have observed with these Metabolic and PPID horses, is they seem to run out of energy faster; they may start out with their normal energy but seem to suddenly hit a brick wall and run out of energy within 15-20 minutes of a normal workload.

    I am so sorry for you and Jessie --- she is a gorgeous gal.

    I hope I have cited a worst case scenario and that you & Jessie have many years of quality time together:)
     
  6. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    My horse is IR, but not Cushings. What helped him drop his number from 37.4 to 17.3 in just two months was magnesium, chaste berry and ground flax. I would also look into Farrier's Formula for the feet.
     
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  7. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    I just ordered a supplement from Smartpak with a little extra vit E and chasteberry. SmartPituitary Senior® Pellets

    I am letting her have the summer "off" and plan on trying to keep her fit, but not doing any lessons or anything. Prascend and her new supplement should both be here this week... she has turned into quite the expensive princess :oops:
     
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  8. gaitedboomer

    gaitedboomer Senior Member

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    Yes, metabolic issues can sure do that.

    My other metabolic horse has been laid to rest (he was 27) ---- between him and the one I still have, it is no joke I could have a high calber Dressage horse and a year's worth of lessons to learn to ride it-----

    1. Also, in case the vet didn't mention this ---- Some horses will go off their feed and can even become lethargic/depressed when they first go on Prascend. Sometimes it takes awhile for their bodies to adjust or the amount of Prascend may need adjusted:)
     
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  9. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    Yes, I've heard that before and vet mentioned it as well. Have you ever heard of building up to 1 mg/day to avoid that? 1 mg just seems like so little to start with, I kind of think I'd rather get her on that full dose asap. If any horse wouldn't lose their appetite on it, it'd be her :rofl:
     
  10. froglander

    froglander Senior Member

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    The mare I used to help take care of that had it (she was in mid to late 20s when I knew her), her biggest thing was getting her to eat. I’m not sure exactly what meds her owner gave her, just that they’d be mixed with applesauce in a syringe so we could give it to her that way (she would turn her nose up at anything added to her feed). She was older and was mostly retired though.

    Come to learn later that it is something that should be checked periodically and may need the dosage increased.

    Good luck!
     
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