Swollen legs

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by NBChoice, Oct 28, 2018.

  1. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    I need some input. I don't have a ton of experience with laminitis and what not.

    My 25 year old mare got laminitis late this summer and she also got diagnosed with cushing's. Is there a period of time weather wise where cushings results are skewed? That's what I've heard. Anyway...

    She was treated and shoeing/trimming was revised based on her condition. She was walking and standing better for a while. Well yesterday she was standing fine, but I noticed her legs are massive. She's normally a petite fine boned girl, so this is just not normal. She also had troubles walking again yesterday. I'm going to go see her right now to see how she is doing, but dont expect any miracles.

    I guess my question is can I expect this to keep occurring even with treatment, or is there a possibility she may get better and be comfortable for a few more years? I dont want the old girl to suffer.

    These pics dont make them look as severe for some reason. It was a little shocking seeing it in person.

    20181027_103507.jpg 20181027_103625.jpg 20181027_103441.jpg

    And just because she's a pretty girl...
    20181027_104212.jpg
    20181027_104719.jpg
     
  2. DocsLglyBlonde

    DocsLglyBlonde Senior Member

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    I haven't experienced it with my PPID mare, but two other horses I've known with Cushing's would stock up in all 4 legs, especially with inactivity, extreme heat, extreme cold, etc. My mare has food allergies that will make her look like that (soy, plus some reaction she had to Smartpak's smart pituitary pellets). She also gets like that from tick bites, so might be worth checking her over for. Otherwise, could she be eating fallen leaves (is she always in that paddock with maple leaves?) or anything to cause a reaction? Any change of activity or weather? I think the PPID horses are just more sensitive to those things it seems.

    ETA This is a great reference for cutoff values during the year, accounting for seasonal rise of ACTH. FB_IMG_1537367271660.jpg
     
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  3. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    Did you just switch hay possibly?? unicorn had stocking up after we switched to our new batch of hay. Vet has seen it very often too.
     
  4. Baboo

    Baboo Senior Member

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    There is a natural rise of ACTH in the fall in all horses, and testing at that time of the year used to be discouraged due to potential false positives. However, with more data now available, labs/vets factor in the rise when interpreting the results, and horses that are very early in the illness can show an exaggerated spike in the fall before other symptoms are noticeable. Many vets recommend testing known, treated PPID horses in the fall to ensure that their dosage of pergolide is providing adequate control year-round. With the age of your mare, and the laminitis (presumably with no other cause), a diagnosis of Cushing's wouldn't be a surprise.
    As for her legs...If her activity level is decreased due to sore feet, she could just be stocked up. I know several PPID horses that do it regularly, but it's a bit difficult to sort out if it is actually a Cushing's thing, a feed thing, or just an old horse thing.
     
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  5. doublelranch

    doublelranch Senior Member

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    Fallen red maple leaves are highly poisonous!! If that was my tree, it would've been firewood long ago.
     
  6. paval

    paval Senior Member

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    Just ingesting one pound of red maple leaves is enough to kill a horse.

    Edit to add, "The ingestion of 1.5-3 gm of leaves per kilogram of body weight (0.7-1.5 kg for the average 450-kg horse) will cause hemolytic disease."
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2018
  7. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    She has been in that stall/run for years and years and she has never eaten the fallen leaves before. She's never eaten any fallen leaves of any kind in the past.
    She has been less active. More so recently she's been standing a lot more rather than moving around. I figured it could be that, but wasnt sure if it was a side effect of cushings or what. And the weather has been all over the place. It's been cold and rainy one week and then warm the next.

    We switched her hay when she was diagnosed in early August. So I would have expected a reaction to occur earlier maybe if that was the reason?

    I had no idea. Thanks for the info.
    It looks like they are poisonous if 1-3 pounds are consumed... which would be a lot of leaves to make up one pound.
    Like I said she never eats fallen leaves. Really anything from the ground. She wont even eat her hay from the ground normally. I will definitely let my parents know though (it's their property and their tree). I'm sure they would have no issues with either removing the tree or moving her.
     
  8. Rhythm 'n Blues

    Rhythm 'n Blues Senior Member

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    Yes - it’s not hay now if you changed it in aug. it was simply a thought as this is about the time of year that people start their winter batch of hay :)
     
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  9. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    Is she in a paddock? Pasture? How big? How many hours a day? Does she move around a lot when she's out?
     
  10. paval

    paval Senior Member

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    There are 2 gigantic beautiful Red Maple trees on my mother's farm next door where my horses are. They are about 70' southwest of the horse barn and the sacrifice paddock. Winds usually come out of the west here and used to blow them into the paddock and I would spend so much time every day raking them up, put them in the wheel barrow to cart elsewhere... until I put 2' high green vinyl/plastic landscape netting fastened to the bottom of the paddock fencing with zip ties. Now the netting catches them since it's usually just the ones blowing across the ground that would blow into the paddock.... and the netting holes are small enough the horses can't pick at them. I do still occasionally rake them up, but at least it doesn't have to be done daily now.
     
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