Spur stop/spur broke help, how to!

Discussion in 'Horse Training' started by Malissa Parzych, Feb 18, 2019.

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  1. Malissa Parzych

    Malissa Parzych Registered

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    Hi a friend of mine just bought a new horse, he is western pleasure and stock seat trained with a spur stop. We are having some difficulty figuring out him out if anyone could explain the spur stop cues I would greatly appreciate it! We just want to be able to ride him better and not unintentionally give him the wrong cues! Anything you can think of we need to know Thank so much!
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  2. BluemoonOKy

    BluemoonOKy Senior Member

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    You've got to be kidding here. Did your friend nkt try the horse out before buying ? Pay someone, a trainer, to come out and show you how. These are more involved things than can be described to you on the interwebz. You have to feel it, it's not just stop and go and buttons for this and that and the other. That's for riding a bike or a car, not a Horse.
     
  3. Malissa Parzych

    Malissa Parzych Registered

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    I understand that....I’m just trying to get a few pointers.....so that we can ride him better!
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  4. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    Spur stop has been miss named forever. Depending what you want to do, and how the horse was trained, it means —-slow down, speed up, change leads, stop, turn, get ready I’m going to ask for something different, you name it. You need help, from someone who knows how, AND, better yet, the person who put this aid on this horse.

    Not trying to be nasty, but you need the training, or else all is for naught. You will confuse the horse, upset yourself and It will all around be very difficult to communicate with him.

    Or completely retrain him.
     
  5. LoveTrail

    LoveTrail Senior Member

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    Sometimes completely retraining doesn't work. Once the horse has that foundation it is harder to make it better than the original training. My two horses the first trainer we were with tried for three years to put reining/70s style buttons on them. Never worked. Left him and went with a trainer for a few months that knew spur stop training. She got them and us improving by leaps and bounds by going back to their foundation.

    You need to either takes lessons from the trainer that trained then horse or at least a trainer that uses spur stops. You can possibly modify to your needs, but it will never completely change.
     
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  6. bobo and horses

    bobo and horses Senior Member

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    But, on the other hand, it can work, and does. We have a horse who was spur trained, and sold iT to a friend whose daughter has cerebral palsy. She could not use her legs, but could use her upper body very well. But, if you want to ride in regular AQHAclasses, not ED classes, one cannot use a crop. So, her parents, in conjunction with a great trainer, changed this spur trained 12 year old to respond to voice commands.

    Took a couple of months, of pretty intensive training, but worked and she does very well in her classes.

    So, it can work, but need time and an experienced trainer.
     
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