Sore Hooves??

Discussion in 'Horse Health' started by lacy, Dec 1, 2006.

  1. lacy

    lacy Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    4,002
    Likes Received:
    271
    I have a question about sore hooves...

    When I went to look at my horse for the first time, she was real ouchy over the gravel driveway. Almost tripping once in a while on herself. I dident think much of it because there were pretty big pebbles in the driveway and I would have been ouchy on them too.

    I brought her home and she spent a month in the yard with no gravel driveway and was fine.

    I moved her to a new farm where she was trimmed for about the third time in her life (she's a yearling) and was trimmed a little too short so she was VERY ouchy for about 2 weeks after that. She got better from that and it has been a month since she was trimmed.

    Well, the day before yesterday she was a little ouchy again on the gravel, but not on grass or smooth cement. She dosent completly limp, but you can tell she is stiff and MUCH slower on the gravel/dirt drive then the grass.

    I was thinking an abcess, but when she was trimmed the ferrier had a good look and said everything looked good.

    I was thinking of soaking her front feet and seeing if I could get an abcess to come out. Are some horses just prone to have soft hooves? What is everyone's initial thought/suggestion?
     






  2. JBandRio

    JBandRio Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2005
    Messages:
    65,751
    Likes Received:
    30,142
    It's more likely that she's not being trimmed correctly, or that she's just not getting the conditioning her feet need to be comfy on gravel. Your feet are fine, but you walk on carpet, maybe hardwood floor, and wear shoes all the time, that's why you are ouchy on gravel. Same for her ;) Spend enough time on gravel, assuming the trim is correct, and she'd be sound there too (and you as well ;)).
     
  3. lacy

    lacy Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    4,002
    Likes Received:
    271
    Thanks JB. I was also thinking that a bit as well. She has never really been on gravel that much in her life. Before I bought her she was on a pasture 24/7, when I got her she was on property where she went into a stall, but there were nodrivways or walkways so she was on grass and mud from the stall to pasture.

    Now, at this new place she has a nice barn with a cement walkway. She has to walk about 200 feet from the barn to the pasture on gravel. Also, when I work with her she has to walk on gravel up to the arena.

    huh, makes sence- thanks...:)
     
  4. Tuxie

    Tuxie Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    367
    Likes Received:
    35
    Does your farrier take out alot of sole? I try to leave as much as possible on my barefoot horses.
     
  5. lacy

    lacy Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    4,002
    Likes Received:
    271
    No he dident. I have only had her trimmed once since I have had her (about 2 months).

    He took more off her toes then the bottom of the foot and filed up the craked parts on the front of her toes.
     
  6. meljean

    meljean Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2006
    Messages:
    10,893
    Likes Received:
    20,083
    If you walk/ride on gravel, or tree roots, or even your horse walking on icy ground, they are liable to be tender footed, and no will probably develop a stone bruise, that will be tender.

    And depending on her breed, bloodline, she could just be thinner soled.
     
  7. lacy

    lacy Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    4,002
    Likes Received:
    271
    huh, well she's a QH. I dot think that QH are more prone- but I could be wrong...

    I geuss I will just concentrate more on waliking on harder, eneven surfaces for a while and see if that makes a difference.

    Anyone have any clue how much and for how long- in general. I know to gradually do it more. But, how long till I should generally see a difference??
     
  8. loosie

    loosie Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    808
    Likes Received:
    75
    As far as thinner soles go, this is an environment/health issue, not breed related. Put a healthy regularly well trimmed horse onto rough ground, make sure he gets enough exercise & you'll produce a tough, thick sole, even on a TB :-0

    Unfortunately Lacy, 'how much/how long' only has one answer - it depends. It depends on the state & health of her feet to start with, the frequency & quality of the trim, the amount of exercise she gets per day generally, as well as on rough ground, the horse in general, the climate/weather, nutrition...

    If you want her to toughen up on gravel, I'd first make sure her feet are in good shape - you can make matters worse 'conditioning' feet if she has some hoof issues. Then make sure she gets a lot of exposure each day to this surface. If she were in an environment that was all rough, she'd toughen up quicker than if she generally lives on softer ground & only has an hour or so on the rough stuff. Go slow tho - don't attempt to trot her over it until she can walk comfortably.

    As JB said, it's much the same as you going barefoot - for eg. those of us who like to go barefoot only in the warmer months are initially ouchy on gravel at the start of Spring & need regular, not too much, not too long per session, conditioning to build up those callouses before we can comfortably go for long periods at any speed on such surfaces.

    Take a look at Barefoot for Soundness for more info.
     
  9. lacy

    lacy Senior Member+

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    4,002
    Likes Received:
    271
    Thanks for the website Loosie!

    I have been concentrating all my time lately on learning things about a horses hooves as I thoought I knew much more (Boy- was I wrong!)

    I have bookmarked the page and have looked for more websites on things such as...

    Parts of the foot.
    Different problems such as Founder and Laminitis.
    How to fix certian problems.
    Learning how to trim (Not planning on trying with out more education and also a farrier right there so I can watch a few times and also have his watch me).
    Where I could take some cheap informational classes on trimming.
    Trimming for different discpiles such as western, barrel racing, reining

    O man- never knew it was this confusing... my grandpa made it look soooooo easy! :)
     






Share This Page