Solving a mystery, where are all these foals coming from???

Discussion in 'Horse Rescue / Adoption' started by meljean, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    I would not be surprised for half the herd to die. They are under weight, stressed and they have not separated the ones with diarrhea from the herd.
     
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  2. Alsosusieq2

    Alsosusieq2 Senior Member

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    It's really sad, yeah some people. No comment on how I feel about them. :(
     
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  3. meljean

    meljean Senior Member

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    Went to see the foals this morning with stormyheart, was told all of the foals are already sold, and that most of them were going to one place. Another woman was told today they were heading to MD. Was also told that 'just given away' in large batch by the man that is responsible for them being trucked into MO.
     
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  4. CoffeeBean

    CoffeeBean Senior Member

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    Oh boy. There are two or three rescues in Maryland that I can imagine some or all going to and all of them play fast and loose with origin stories.
     
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  5. Garfield70

    Garfield70 Senior Member

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    One question about orphan foal raising. It's not ideal but apparently calves can be raised without a mother with not much psychological damage to the calf/cow. It's routine with milk cow breeds. That is not possible with foals?
     
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  6. Kristal H

    Kristal H Senior Member

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    I have successfully raised a bottle baby, and he matures into a Helahry Multi Didipkone Champion..... but that was a lot different circumstance than what is happening to these babies.

    These foals are under weight, show signs of diarrhea, parasites, probably have ulcers and during what is the fastest growth period....this can cause permanent skeletal developmental problems. Cows get eaten it’s ok if they don’t move well under saddle.... most people that want a horse want a sound riding horse.
     
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  7. equinitis

    equinitis Senior Member

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    It can absolutely be done with a foal. It is so easy to make a pet of an orphan foal though and that is where folks made a mistake. I don't know much about dairy calves raised t the dairy but, although they are handled, they are not petted and spoiled. We raised numerous bottle calves growing up. My dad bought day old calves dropped at the sale barn pretty cheap and we raised the for beef. The first few were rotten to the core because my sister and I made pets out of them. They stopped being cute at around 100lbs and we figured it out after the first 2.

    It is the same with foals. A mature equine baby sitter is ideal, one that is patient but not necessarily tolerant of bad behavior. They learn equine body language, which really seems to be very instinctual, and they learn to be polite with others.

    We've raised two orphaned mules, one on a bottle and one with a bucket. Both are pretty good individuals and are not rude or pushy on the ground. Freckles definitely acts like a bottle baby but he is permitted some liberties the others don't get as he ages!
     
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  8. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    I realize this is an older comment, BUT I wanted to address it.
    For one, dairy cows cows have not been bred with mothering instincts in mind for many many generations. It simply has not been one of the criteria. So, most cows are mediocre mothers at best. Most older cows won't even consider allowing their calves to nurse-- they prefer the soft silicone inflations over the bumbling, razor-tooth mouth of their offspring, please and thank you. Separation usually involves sticking a bottle in the mouth of the calf and walking away while the calf follows. The mother occasionally calls to it a few times, but if there is food to be eaten or a nap to be taken, the calf is irrelevant.
    The calves are also fed colostrum within hours of birth, navels dipped, vaccines given, and isolated ASAP, where they are next to their peers in age. Most calves bond closely with their neighbor. Anyone who has been following animal husbandry knows to keep calves in look-but-don't-touch isolation for a few weeks, and then move calves into even groups so the bonded pairs can stay together, and virtually everyone, no matter how many calves, tries to keep calf groups under 20 calves. Even when in groups, everyone has a system for monitoring feed intake for individual calves whether it is a high-tech computerized collar or a visual inspection while the calf eats. Great care is given to the quality, quantity, and temperature of their milk, and usually there is a nice fluffy free choice hay and maybe even free choice calf starter as well.
    The boys obviously are treated differently, but again, all but the crappiest human beings give them plenty of colostrum, dip the navel, and wait until it is dry to send them to auction. There they are picked up by veal growers, who bring them home, isolate them at once, give them warm electrolytes followed by medicated milk replacer at the appropriate intervals, and probably a precautionary round of antibiotics. Some will die, but since they are in the hands of experienced calf raisers, that number will be low, and even veal growers know that keeping track of social bonds increases growth.

    These foals have not recieved any of the care or consideration that is standard for dairy calves. Their prospects are not good, for their mentally health or physical health.
     
  9. meljean

    meljean Senior Member

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    Hearing from others who took foals on, and about 50% mortality is still the norm.
     
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  10. meljean

    meljean Senior Member

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    Have found out more, there were couple of hundred foals taken to auction in Nevada MO, they were there on May 22nd.
     
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