So you've been accused of being a bad, incompetent, unsafe horse person?

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by NaeNae, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. Pirate

    Pirate Senior Member

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    I gave Nobby her breakfast, grain with cookies and carrots and molasses...
    Then I pulled out my breakfast, an Apple, and took one bite. Immediately her head snaps up and she has this disbelieving face on as she counted every mouthful of HER apple that I was daring to eat in front of her.
     
  2. StraightandTrue

    StraightandTrue Senior Member

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    Amen to that. We know horses respond to threats with either fight or flight, but many forget that people are wired the same. If you give someone advice in an aggressive manner there is a strong chance they will either argue with you (fight) or hide away in shame (flight). Neither is a desirable outcome.

    Apart from trying to imagine how you'd feel if you received a harshly worded comment, a very simple technique you can use is sandwich feedback. That is to say you sandwich the negative feedback between two pieces of positive feedback.

    So instead of saying:
    "Sell the horse, you're clueless, get instruction and a clue, idiot!"

    You might say:
    "Your horse is in great condition and you obviously take excellent care of it. It does seem as if you're struggling. There is a chance the horse may not be suitable for your level of experience, or that you may need an experienced instructor/trainer to help you work through these issues. But you should be very proud of how healthy and happy your horse looks."

    Yes, it's more keystrokes, but which piece of advice do you think people are more likely to listen to? If you want people to listen to you, you need to think about the best way to deliver your advice. Otherwise people will either get bent out of shape or log out, never to be seen again.
     
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  3. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Since, apparently, lunging a horse with gloves is an *absolute must* and very important,;) I’m going to add that I never, ever lunge a horse with gloves. Not even my horse who is known to buck and pull at the line. :p

    Yes, I got rope burn once. No, I don’t care. :rofl:
     
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  4. Bakkir

    Bakkir Senior Member

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    I have gloves - in my tack box. Only because it was drilled into me @ 12 that a lady ALWAYS wears gloves when riding.

    I have yet to wear them, but I do have them, lol.

    Can't say I have ever worn gloves when lunging.
     
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  5. Dona Worry

    Dona Worry Senior Member

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    ALL OF THIS.
     
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  6. StarPattern

    StarPattern Senior Member

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    The phrase I use most often when introducing newbies to my horses is, "Don't do what I do!" as I duck under my mare's neck or sit on the ground while clipping her legs. I know my mares and I trust them to behave a certain way, but I always warn newbies of the proper, safe way to do things and why. I bet they all think I'm the worst, most dangerous person in the world. haha.
     
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  7. reicheru

    reicheru Senior Member

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    Eeeeeh... I'm currently sitting in a chair, fiddling on my phone while my mare is ground tied as I cold hose her leg. All sorts of no nos but I know my mare and the risks are calculated... I'm good. Better than fainting from the heat I guess
     
  8. Suzanneszoo

    Suzanneszoo Senior Member

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    I know!

    My mare gets her 1 carrot every evening, and you'd think I was betraying her when I give the other horses their carrots. It's like Patrick with the chocolate bar.

    "Where's MY carrot??"

    "You ate it already."

    "No, I didn't! I never ever get ANY treats!"

    Good thing Fjords are supposed to look plus sized,otherwise I'd have to hide from all the fat shamers.
     
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  9. MzCarol

    MzCarol Senior Member

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    Regarding horses, and I suppose life in general (driving, etc) =

    "An accident is only an accident if you have done everything in your power to prevent it".

    One cannot wear flip flops to the barn and label it a freak accident when the horse puts a hoof in the wrong place and degloves said foot. PUT BOOTS ON - or at least tennis shoes!

    Another one = "The only predictable thing about horses is their unpredictability". They are still wild animals with wild animal instincts no matter how much we love them or how hard we train them.

    Does this make me fearful? Heck no! It makes me smart!
     
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  10. Arem

    Arem Senior Member

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    Horses aren’t wild. They are domesticated. Look at the difference between horses and zebras. Zebras are the truly wild equine and they are mostly not trainable. (They can be trained, but it’s about as “easy” and successful as training a lion)
     
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