Show me your western spurs!

Discussion in 'Tack & Equipment' started by ofauxaffliction, Oct 22, 2014.

  1. ofauxaffliction

    ofauxaffliction Senior Member

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    So I'm just curious what everyone prefers. Or feel free to share more than one and what reasons you choose each!

    My mare is... well... a bit of a diva at time. Been riding in 9pt roweled spurs for over a year but suddenly she's kinda sassy and twitchy about them. So I went to a pair of knob/ball end equitation spurs and she was much more chill about the whole thing -- but not quite as.. finessed? If that makes sense. She paid just enough attention to them to get buy but would kinda blow them off if you asked for more than she wanted to give. So then last night, I found a pair of cloverleafs and she seemed to do well in them. Not nearly as touchy about me using them, but also respected them unlike the ball spurs. The only thing I didn't like was they had a super short shank and I have pretty long legs, so I had to move my leg a lot more than normal to use them.

    I'm going to continue riding in those CL's for a few days to see how it goes before I decide if I should get my own -- but in the meatime what do you ride in and why? Just because I am curious :) (and I also have a spur/spur strap fetish and want 10,000 pairs so I want to see them all haha)
     
  2. Muppetgirl

    Muppetgirl Senior Member

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    If I could post pics I would!! I have three pairs - one pair with two inch shanks and a very blunt rowel for everyday riding, another pair with two inch shanks that's a little 'pokier' than the blunt pair (he hates those ones) and then I have an uber pokey five point rowel pair (not quite rock grinders) that I use maybe once every six months.
     
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  3. abarton0819

    abarton0819 Full Member

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    I ride in a short shank ball spur...not the super long swan neck equitation type, and sometimes (especially towards the end of longer shows when the ponies start to get tired/lazy) a simple nine point or cloverleaf rowel. Generally, I like to use them a day or two, then take them off and carry a dressage whip for a day or so to back up my leg if I need to. Sometimes a reminder smack is more effective than nagging with a spur all the time. I absolutely can not stand riding a horse that "has" to be ridden with spurs. Not listening to your leg is a fundamental lack of respect, which is why I like to correct with the spur/whip, then give them a chance to be correct on their own. Maybe I'm a big ol meanie, but I like my horses to be responsible for their own carriage and respond to me without my having to babysit them constantly.
     
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  4. ofauxaffliction

    ofauxaffliction Senior Member

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    I both agree and disagree with this statement. I mean, I ride a Western Pleasure horse. In the show pen -- you basically cannot use your hands. So your spurs are what fine-tune your horse. My horse is ridden almost entirely off of a combination of leg and/or spur. If I take off my spurs will she still move forward? Yes, of course. But will I get the same movement, collection and finesse as with them? Absolutely not. So while she *can* be ridden without spurs, she cannot be ridden at the same level without them. For me, my spurs do not mean forward.
     
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  5. Muppetgirl

    Muppetgirl Senior Member

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    Spurs for me are solely for lateral movement - reinforces my leg. I hardly ever have to use them but am glad they are there when I do need them. They are not for forward.
     
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  6. Peanut Palomino

    Peanut Palomino Senior Member

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    I ride in spurs daily. I grew up in a cutting barn, did barrel racing my whole life, and dabbled in WP and reining for years "part time." So spurs were just always there. I never used them when I was young, and didn't start using rowels until I was about 17-18.
    Spurs have never been a tool for forward motion. Just a way to quiet my leg and administer more invisible cues for turning, bending, etc.
    Forward motion is cued with seat for the most part, and sometimes I'll roll my calves in (without making spur contact).
    The rowels are used in everyday schooling. I have this pair, cheap but functional:

    download.jpg

    But when barrel racing, I use large ball spurs like this:
    21454.jpg
    And riding English, I use these:
    1320-1.jpg

    Again, they let me keep my cues light and quiet, that's the only reason they're there.
     
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  7. bnttyra

    bnttyra Senior Member

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    I always ride in spurs but don't always use them. Especially on my older mare, she doesn't need them but I will have to remind her especially when we are working a cow, to not get so close. Otherwise, I don't need them with her. My daughter does however mostly because she doesn't have the same leg strength and while my mare is very good about listen to your legs, she has gotten lazy with my daughter. They have improved dramatically over the last year and she doesn't have to use them as much.

    With the 4 year old, well, she is still having some issues with being naughty and diving into the fence so having that spur to help remind her that isn't allowed helps a ton. I start with just calf but will up the pressure if she ignores it which she still does from time to time.

    And my spurs started out as rock grinders, like 6 years ago and are no where near what they used to be. I needed the rock grinders for a dead sided WP horse. They are pretty dull now which is good.

    And I want to add, I have NEVER left even a slight mark on any of my horses. I have never had to use the spurs that much and usually use my calves more and only remind with the spurs.
     
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  8. Bullbreaker

    Bullbreaker Full Member

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    Here mine's . Top called the WYO (Wyoming)
    Bottom is a Ken McNabb professional chiose brand.
     

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  9. Donavans Fire

    Donavans Fire Senior Member+

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    My current pair aren't ideal but spurs are just so silly expensive that I've been making do. I bought them for shows, where I like to have a long arm and a rowel. They're something like this:

    [​IMG]

    For everyday, I like bumpers, but I don't currently have any.

    Been on the hunt for some black English spurs with a not-tiny arm and haven't had much luck, but now I see a pair on Schneiders that I just might pick up.

    I also generally buy men's spurs because I have sasquatch sized feet and they just seem to work better.
     
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  10. Muppetgirl

    Muppetgirl Senior Member

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    Donovan I spread my spurs as I find none fit nice over the back of my boot - essentially I put my toe on one side of the spur and pull with my hand just to open it up more!
     

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