Should I Buy a Horse (Again)?

Discussion in 'Horse Chat' started by KyB1107, Nov 25, 2018.

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Should I buy a horse?

  1. Yes

    1 vote(s)
    16.7%
  2. No

    5 vote(s)
    83.3%
  1. KyB1107

    KyB1107 Registered

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    hi everyone...
    So I am feeling very conflicted about whether or not I should buy my own horse right now. I have been riding on and off since I was 10 (I’m 20 now). I had my own horse for about 4 1/2 - 5ish years and, heartbreakingly, had to sell him because I was going to college in the city and couldn’t bring him with me. It was truly my biggest regret but he is in a good home now and is very happy. I am now commuting to school and getting back into riding after a 3 year break. I plan on eventing at a low level this summer and have been looking at horses which I think might suit me. I am only so hesitant to buy because I am still getting back in the saddle so to speak. I know how to care for a horse and the costs and time commitment involved but I feel like because my riding level isn’t what it used to be that I should wait. However, I really think bonding with a horse and getting to know him/her and having a true partner for eventing will be the best option. I can w/t/c at nearly the same level as before and I’m starting over little cross rails again and regaining my balance over jumps (I used to jump up to 3’) I would ride him/her 3 days a week during the school year and more over breaks. I found 3 horses which may be the perfect fit, quiet, gentle, able to adjust to rider’s level, etc. Basically should I let my riding level determine whether or not I get a horse again?
     
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  2. Mcdreamer

    Mcdreamer Senior Member

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    Maybe leasing a horse for awhile might be a good option for you? And no, your riding level shouldn't determine whether you get a horse or not. Your financial stability should determine whether you get a horse or not.
     
  3. KyB1107

    KyB1107 Registered

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    Thank you! I was thinking that might be a good option as well.
     
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  4. Alyssa Hughes

    Alyssa Hughes Senior Member+

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    Leasing sounds like a good option to me if it is available to you.
     
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  5. NBChoice

    NBChoice Senior Member

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    If you are already this hesitant about it then I would say probably not right now.
     
  6. slc

    slc Senior Member

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    How about taking lessons? It would be good to find a barn that has your interest (eventing) at heart. Since you've been out of riding for so long, usually what happens is that when you first start back you feel very confident, then your confidence drops like a lead balloon(lol) and then it slowly starts that upward curve again. When it starts going up you could make the jump to a half lease, then a full lease.

    And...I guess the reason I'm suggesting such a cautious path was that as I got into my junior and senior year of college, it started eating up a lot of time. I had some terms where I was taking 17-20 credits to get my degree done. I saw horse owning friends having to sell their horses, and quit riding entirely toward the end of school. Then after college they were traveling a lot and moving around - finding a job. So, in fact the end of college and that first year of working can be really tough for horse ownership, not the least because of finances.
     
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  7. turnnburnlynx

    turnnburnlynx Senior Member

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    I think it would be fine to buy a horse, if the only reason you are worried about is your riding level. Make sure to buy a horse who is easy for you to ride and get a long with, and then take lessons on him.
     
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  8. bellalou

    bellalou Senior Member

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    I like the idea of leasing when you're in the position that you are. School does take up a lot of time, as does job searching and getting settled after college. Leasing is a good way to get riding time and bridge that gap without the full responsibility of ownership.
     
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  9. manesntails

    manesntails Senior Member

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    Don't take this the wrong way, please: You are college educated; please use paragraphs. I'm old and blocks of typing are very hard to follow along on without losing place.

    You don't need to know a horse to ride it correctly. Look at catch riders, they ride whatever horse they are mounted on without and “bond-thingy“. Correct riding, feel and timing trump the horse being familiar with you.

    I would keep taking lessons, get myself in great riding shape, then look for a horse to either lease or buy. No sense buying for a “bond thingy thing since good riding and good conditioning is never overridden by the fact that you are the only rider of that horse.
     
  10. jojozwiebel

    jojozwiebel Full Member

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    Leasing or lessons at an eventing barn.
     

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